Skip to content Skip to navigation

Upcoming

  • Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    NICOLE KING, UC BERKELEY

    The origin of animals represents one of the pivotal transitions in life’s history, and one of its greatest unsolved mysteries. While the fossil record remains silent regarding the rise of multicellularity, the genetic and developmental foundations of animal origins may be deduced from shared elements among extant animals and their protozoan relatives, the choanoflagellates. To better understand the origin and evolution of animals, Dr. King's lab is reconstructing the minimal genomic complexity of the unicellular progenitors of animals; elucidating the ancestral functions of genes required for animal development; and characterizing choanoflagellate cell and developmental biology.

    January 30, 2020 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    Bass Biology, Room 122
    Bass Biology Building, 327 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    OVIJIT CHAUDHURI, DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    Attend Dr. Chaudhuri's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Kenneth Yamada's seminar, "Dynamics of 3D Cell Migration and Organogenesis", to be held Thursday, February 20th.

    February 18, 2020 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    ANNA-KATERINA HADJANTONAKIS, MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER

    Cancer is a condition promoted by cells undergoing an identity crisis. An understanding of how cells control their identity (cell fate specification), and how they organize themselves into normal tissues (morphogenesis) provides the blueprint for the fundamental biological processes that become deregulated in cancer. The Hadjantonakis laboratory uses high-resolution quantitative methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying stem cell specification, cellular differentiation, tissue organization and growth. They use the mammalian embryo as a platform, and the mouse as a primary model system. They also exploit in vitro cultured stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells, for their studies.

    February 20, 2020 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    Bass Biology, Room 122
    Bass Biology Building, 327 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Stanford bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    KENNETH YAMADA, NIH NIDCR

    Dr. Kenneth Yamada's group's overall research goals are to discover novel mechanisms and regulators of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix and their roles in craniofacial development and disease pathogenesis. The mechanobiology underlying cell migration, spatially regulated deposition of matrix, and sculpting of initially unorganized cells into complex branched organs are being characterized and experimentally manipulated using mouse embryonic organ culture and 3D human cell and spheroid models. These studies provide unexpected new insights into the dynamic forces and specific molecules involved in 3D cell migration and the remodeling of epithelial cells into 3D embryonic tissue architecture.

    February 20, 2020 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
  • The Stanford Bio-X Leadership Council is pleased to announce the 17th annual competition for Stanford Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowships and for the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and Stanford ChEM-H Fellowships.

    Complete applications must be received by February 24, 2020 at 5:00 pm PST.

    February 24, 2020 5:00 PM
  • JOIN US FOR A STANFORD BIO-X POSTER SESSION!

    February 26, 2020 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
    James H. Clark Center
    318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    SOPHIE HELAINE, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

    Salmonella is the causative agent of various diseases, ranging from gastro-enteritis to typhoid fever. We have recently discovered that upon infection of host cells, there is a dramatic increase in the proportion of the Salmonella population that forms persisters. A family of genes, named Toxin/Antitoxin modules, is known to be involved in the formation of persisters in a non-pathogenic bacterial species, but almost nothing is known about these genes in pathogenic bacteria like Salmonella. The Helaine lab investigates their function, particularly in relation to persistence of Salmonellato antibiotics during infection. Understanding mechanisms of action of such genes could provide ways to prevent bacteria from becoming persisters, or force them out of that state so they become re-sensitised to antibiotics.

    February 27, 2020 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    Bass Biology, Room 122
    Bass Biology Building, 327 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    XIAOKE CHEN, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    Attend Dr. Chen's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Yi Zhang's seminar, "Understanding the Brain Reward System", to be held Thursday, March 5th.

    March 03, 2020 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Stanford bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    YI ZHANG, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

    Over the last decade, the Zhang lab has made significant contributions to the epigenetic field by identifying and characterizing many chromatin modifying enzymes. Their studies have revealed that some of these enzymes play critical roles in cancer.

    March 05, 2020 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
  • Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    HARRIS WANG, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    The Wang lab applies synthetic and systems biology approaches to design and build new microbes with novel capabilities, leveraging both engineering and evolutionary principles. They are interested in developing platform technologies and using them to answer fundamental biological questions. Their research interests include: genome engineering; human microbiome; synthetic ecosystems; evolution and epistasis; and new genetic codes.

    March 12, 2020 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    Bass Biology, Room 122
    Bass Biology Building, 327 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305

Pages