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  • The award-winning "brain stethoscope" converts brain waves into sound to detect seizures: Drs. Josef Parvizi, Professor of Neurology, and Chris Chafe, Duca Family Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Computer Research in Music & Acoustics, discuss their Stanford Bio-X supported collaboration.

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    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, Celebrating the Clark Center, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Special Announcement

    Stanford Bio-X has officially begun the 8th round of its Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grant Program (IIP) with 22 newly awarded projectsIn this round, Bio-X received 128 exemplary applications that were meticulously reviewed in a 2-round process.  With these 22 new projects, Bio-X has now funded 187 IIP projects since 2000.  Click here to learn more about the IIP!

    In addition, the 13th round of the Bio-X PhD Fellowships have officially started with 22 newly award FellowsThey have been selected from 100+ outstanding applications, resulting in a total of 220 Bio-X PhD Fellows in the past 12 years.  Click here to learn more about the PhD Fellowship program!


    NEWS



    PERSIS DRELL NAMED STANFORD PROVOST

    An accomplished academic leader and longtime member of the Stanford community, Drell will become the university's chief academic officer and chief budgetary officer.  She will assume the role Feb. 1.




    STANFORD-LED STUDY FINDS FLAW IN GLOBAL EFFORT TO MITIGATE CARBON EMISSION

    Research from Bio-X Travel Awardee Amy Pickering




    Q&A WITH STANFORD STATISTICS PROFESSOR SUSAN HOLMES: STATISTICS IN THE ERA OF BIG DATA

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Susan Holmes




    MORE GABA IN ONE BRAIN REGION LINKED TO BETTER WORKING MEMORY

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Jong Yoon




    DNA SEQUENCING DETERMINES LYMPHOMA ORIGIN, PROGNOSIS

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Maximilian Diehn and Ash Alizadeh





    TRAUMATIC STRESS CHANGES BRAINS OF BOYS, GIRLS DIFFERENTLY

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Victor Carrion




    A NEW MACHINE CAN SEND MESSAGES VIA COMMON HOUSEHOLD CHEMICALS

    Research from Electrical Engineering Faculty Andrea Goldsmith


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS


    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 187 projects over 8 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums. Please click below to learn more about the research from the latestpIIP symposium on Aug 24, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 220 Fellows over the past 13 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 436 Stanford undergraduates over the past 11 rounds.


    EVENTS

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    PRE-SEMINAR for Dr. Brett Bouma's "The development of optical coherence tomography as a medical device"
    Audrey Bowden, PhD, Stanford
    December 6, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S361

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    SEMINAR: "The development of optical coherence tomography as a medical device"
    Brett Bouma, PhD, Harvard and MGH
    December 8, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    PRE-SEMINAR for Dr. Samuel Stupp's "Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Helen Blau, PhD, Stanford
    January 17, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S361

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    SEMINAR:"Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Samuel Stupp, PhD, Northwestern
    January 19, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    November 21, 2016
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email


    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, Celebrating the Clark Center, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Special Highlight: VISITING SCHOLAR FELLOWSHIPS

    Stanford Bio-X and the Novo Nordisk Foundation have a 3-round joint visiting scholar fellowship program that results in up to 2 exceptional Danish Visiting Scholars selected per round to be hosted and co-mentored by Stanford Bio-X affiliated faculty for 3 years each to conduct interdisciplinary research in the biosciences. This opportunity enhances the research experience and training of each visiting scholar at the highest international level, and also strengthens the exchange of scientific expertise between Stanford and Denmark before each scholar returns to Denmark. 

    Click here to view the research abstracts of 4 selected scholars so far to this international fellowship. 


    If you're interested in learning more about this collaboration and cultivating such opportunities with Bio-X, please contact Stanford Bio-X.


    NEWS



    DNA IN WASTEWATER COULD PROVIDE CLUES TO HELP COMMUNITY HEALTH, STANFORD RESEARCHERS SAY

    Bio-X IIP Seed Grant Research Project from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Craig Criddle, Christopher Francis, Stephen Luby, Susan Holmes, and Justin Sonnenburg




    STANFORD RESEARCHERS SAY SCHOOL KIDS CAN DO SAFE AND SIMPLE BIOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTS OVER THE INTERNET

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ingmar Riedel-Kruse and Paulo Blikstein and Bio-X SIGF Fellow Zahid Hossain that previously received Bio-X IIP Seed Grant Program funding





    BLOOD TEST COULD PROVIDE CHEAPER, BETTER WAY FOR DOCTORS TO MANAGE LUNG CANCER

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Sam Gambhir and Shan Wang




    STUDY ESTABLISHES EXTENT OF HUMAN BRAIN EXCITED BY SPECIFIC DOSE OF ELECTRICITY

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Josef Parvizi




    STUDY REVEALS DRUG INTERACTIONS THAT MAY REDUCE MORTALITY IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Nigam Shah





    BIRDS FLYING THROUGH LASER LIGHT REVEAL FAULTS IN FLIGHT RESEARCH, STANFORD STUDY SHOWS

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty David Lentink







    RESEARCH LOCATES ABSENCE EPILEPSY SEIZURE "CHOKE POINT" IN BRAIN

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty John Huguenard





    WHO NEEDS A BODY?  NOT THESE LARVAE, WHICH ARE BASICALLY SWIMMING HEADS

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Christopher Lowe


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS


    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 187 projects over 8 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums. Please click below to learn more about the research from the latestpIIP symposium on Aug 24, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 220 Fellows over the past 13 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 436 Stanford undergraduates over the past 11 rounds.


    EVENTS

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    PRE-SEMINAR for Dr. Samuel Stupp's "Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Helen Blau, PhD, Stanford
    January 17, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S361

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    SEMINAR:"Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Samuel Stupp, PhD, Northwestern
    January 19, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR
    Eric Siggia, PhD, Rockefeller University
    January 19, 2017
    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    December 19, 2016
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email


    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, Celebrating the Clark Center, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Special Highlight: VISITING SCHOLAR FELLOWSHIPS

    Stanford Bio-X and the Novo Nordisk Foundation have a 3-round joint visiting scholar fellowship program that results in up to 2 exceptional Danish Visiting Scholars selected per round to be hosted and co-mentored by Stanford Bio-X affiliated faculty for 3 years each to conduct interdisciplinary research in the biosciences. This opportunity enhances the research experience and training of each visiting scholar at the highest international level, and also strengthens the exchange of scientific expertise between Stanford and Denmark before each scholar returns to Denmark. 

    Click here to view the research abstracts of 4 selected scholars so far to this international fellowship. 


    If you're interested in learning more about this collaboration and cultivating such opportunities with Bio-X, please contact Stanford Bio-X.


    NEWS



    NIH AWARDS $26.4 MILLION TO STANFORD RESEARCHERS FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY STUDY

    Funding awarded to 3 Bio-X affiliated faculty: Michael Snyder, Stephen Montgomery, and Euan Ashley




    STANFORD STUDY SHOWS THAT TISSUE IN THE BRAIN, RATHER THAN BEING LOST, GROWS ACROSS CHILDHOOD AND MAY UNDERLIE BETTER FACE RECOGNITION

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Kalanit Grill-Spector









    STARFISH LARVAE CREATE COMPLEX WATER WHORLS TO EAT AND RUN

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Manu Prakash




    RESEARCHERS USE WORLD'S SMALLEST DIAMONDS TO MAKE WIRES THREE ATOMS WIDE

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Nicholas Melosh and SLAC/Stanford Faculty Zhi-Xun Shen




    GENE ACTIVITY PREDICTS PROGRESSION OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Purvesh Khatri





    STANFORD ENGINEERS FIND THAT A NEW MEMORY TECHNOLOGY MAY BE MORE ENERGY EFFICIENT THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty H.-S. Philip Wong





    NO MORE BURNING BATTERIES?  STANFORD SCIENTISTS TURN TO AI TO CREATE SAFER LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES

    Research by Materials Science & Engineering Faculty Evan Reed


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS


    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 187 projects over 8 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums. Please click below to learn more about the research from the latestpIIP symposium on Aug 24, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 220 Fellows over the past 13 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 436 Stanford undergraduates over the past 11 rounds.


    EVENTS

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    PRE-SEMINAR for Dr. Samuel Stupp's "Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Helen Blau, PhD, Stanford
    January 17, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S361

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES
    SEMINAR:"Guiding Bio Regeneration with Supramolecular Materials"
    Samuel Stupp, PhD, Northwestern
    January 19, 2017
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR
    Eric Siggia, PhD, Rockefeller University
    January 19, 2017
    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR
    Jodi Nunnari, UC Davis
    February 9, 2017
    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    January 09, 2017
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email


    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, Celebrating the Clark Center, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Special Highlight: VISITING SCHOLAR FELLOWSHIPS

    Stanford Bio-X and the Novo Nordisk Foundation have a 3-round joint visiting scholar fellowship program that results in up to 2 exceptional Danish Visiting Scholars selected per round to be hosted and co-mentored by Stanford Bio-X affiliated faculty for 3 years each to conduct interdisciplinary research in the biosciences. This opportunity enhances the research experience and training of each visiting scholar at the highest international level, and also strengthens the exchange of scientific expertise between Stanford and Denmark before each scholar returns to Denmark. 

    Click here to view the research abstracts of 4 selected scholars so far to this international fellowship. 


    If you're interested in learning more about this collaboration and cultivating such opportunities with Bio-X, please contact Stanford Bio-X.



    MARCH 1: Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium

    Speakers: Drs. Ellen Kuhl, Lisa Giocomo, Gill Bejerano, Sarah Heilshorn, Frederick Chin, Merritt Maduke, and David Lentink
    Time/Location: 1:00pm-3:40pm, Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    Poster Session: 3:40pm-5:00pm, Nexus Café


    NEWS



    IN STANFORD STUDY, WORMS DINE ON NANOPARTICLES TO HELP TEST BIOLOGICAL FORCE SENSOR TECHNOLOGY

    Bio-X awarded IIP Seed Grant project to Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Jennifer Dionne and Miriam Goodman


    Stanford bioengineers develop a 20-cent, hand-powered centrifuge


    INSPIRED BY A WHIRLIGIG TOY, STANFORD BIOENGINEERS DEVELOP A 20-CENT, HAND-POWERED BLOOD CENTRIFUGE RECOGNITION

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Manu Prakash and 2012/2013 Travel Award recipient Georgios Katsikis




    TECHNIQUE REVEALS MOVEMENTS OF IMMUNE CELLS AS THEY HUNT FOR TUMORS

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Sam Gambhir





    WEARABLE SENSORS CAN TELL WHEN YOU ARE GETTING SICK

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michael Snyder





    RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY SOURCE OF OPIOIDS' SIDE EFFECTS

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Gregory Scherrer and 2015 Bio-X Honorary Fellow Jasmine Dickinson





    CAFFEINE MAY COUNTER AGE-RELATED INFLAMMATION

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Mark Davis and 2013 Bio-X Bowes Fellow Gabriela Fragiadakis




    BODYWIDE IMMUNE RESPONSE IMPORTANT FOR FIGHTING CANCER

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ed Engleman








    DIABETES IMPAIRS ACTIVITY OF BONE STEM CELLS IN MICE, INHIBITS FRACTURE REPAIR

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michael Longaker





    TOXIC BRAIN CELLS MAY DRIVE MANY NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ben Barres


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS


    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 187 projects over 8 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums. Please click below to learn more about the research from the latestpIIP symposium on Aug 24, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 220 Fellows over the past 13 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 436 Stanford undergraduates over the past 11 rounds.


    EVENTS

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR
    Jodi Nunnari, UC Davis
    February 9, 2017
    2:15 pm - 3:15 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES PRE-SEMINAR
    Annelise Barron, Stanford
    February 14, 2017
    12:15 PM - 1:00 PM
    James H. Clark Center S361

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES SEMINAR
    "Immunoengineering and the lymphatic system: New insights into immunity and cancer"
    Melody Swartz, University of Chicago
    February 16, 2017
    12:15 PM - 1:00 PM
    James H. Clark Center S360

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR

    Laura Johnston, Columbia University
    February 23, 2017
    2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
    James H. Clark Center S360

     


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    January 23, 2017
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email


    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, Celebrating the Clark Center, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Special Announcement

     

    Stanford Bio-X has officially begun the 8th round of its Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grant Program (IIP) with 22 newly awarded projectsIn this round, Bio-X received 128 exemplary applications that were meticulously reviewed in a 2-round process.  With these 22 new projects, Bio-X has now funded 187 IIP projects since 2000.  Click here to learn more about the IIP!


    NEWS


    STANFORD SCIENTISTS UNCOVER HOW A FLUCTUATING BRAIN NETWORK MAY MAKE US BETTER THINKERS

    Research from Psychology Faculty Russell Poldrack that was previously funded by the Bio-X NeuroVentures




    A NEW SIMULATION TOOL HELPS SHOW HOW THE BRAIN REACTS TO TRAUMA

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ellen Kuhl




    SMARTPHONE MICROSCOPE DEVELOPED BY STANFORD BIOENGINEER CREATES INTERACTIVE TOOL FOR MICROBIOLOGY

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ingmar Riedel-Kruse





    GENE COULD HELP EXPLAIN INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Joshua Knowles





    ZIKA INFECTION CAUSES DEVELOPING CRANIAL CELLS TO SECRETE NEUROTOXIC LEVELS OF IMMUNE MOLECULES

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Catherine Blish





    STANFORD RESEARCHERS SHOW AIR BAG BIKE HELMETS HAVE PROMISE

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty David Camarillo





    PRIONS CAN PASS ON BENEFICIAL TRAITS, STUDY SAYS

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Daniel Jarosz


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS


    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 164 projects over 7 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums. Please click below to learn more about the research from the latestpIIP symposium on Aug 24, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 198 Fellows over the past 12 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 371 Stanford undergraduates over the past 10 rounds.


    EVENTS

    BIO-X FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES PRE-SEMINAR (for Dr. Molly Shoichet's Seminar on Nov 3)
    Fan Yang, PhD, Stanford
    November 1, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1 pm
    James H. Clark Center S361

    BIO-X FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES SEMINAR: "Strategies for more predictable drug screening and drug delivery in cancer"
    Molly Shoichet, PhD, University of Toronto
    November 3, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1 pm
    James H. Clark Center S360


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    October 10, 2016
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email


    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    We are pleased to announce a world-class, three-day symposium on Tissue Engineering co-hosted by Stanford Bio-X and University of Sydney ADATE.

    Please mark your calendars for September 12-14, 2016, and click on the poster for more information as well as registration!


    CELEBRATING THE CLARK CENTER

    Unlike traditional research buildings that keep disciplines separate, the Clark Center was intended to inspire chance encounters between residents from a mix of disciplines and allow creative science to flourish.


    NEWS

     

    WHERE HE TOOK US

    Stanford President John Hennessy's goal to reshape education and research was aided by Stanford Bio-X as a catalyst for broad thinking in pursuit of better human health



    INNOVATIONS IN MEDICAL IMAGING ARE RESHAPING THE WAR AGAINST CANCER

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Adam de la Zerda, related to work from the 2012 Bio-X IIP Seed Grant


     

    STANFORD ENGINEERS DESIGN A HOME URINE TEST THAT COULD SCAN FOR DISEASES

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Audrey Ellerbee Bowden and 2014 Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program participant Matthew Millett


     

     

    SMALL WONDER: HOW NANOTECHNOLOGY COULD DETECT AND TREAT CANCER

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Sam Gambhir and Shan Wang


     

    THE HIDDEN LIVES OF RNA MOLECULES REVEALED BY STANFORD TECHNIQUE

    Research by Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Howard Chang


     

    TRACKING AUTISM:  A SOCIAL NEUROSCIENTIST'S HUNT FOR AUTISM BIOMARKERS

    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Karen Parker


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS

    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 164 projects over 7 rounds.

    Awarded IIP Seed Grant projects are highlighted through our symposiums.  Please click below to learn more about the research from the latest IIP symposium on Feb 17, 2016.

    SEED GRANTS ABSTRACTS POSTER TITLES


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 198 Fellows over the past 12 rounds.


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford under-graduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 371 Stanford undergraduates over the past 10 rounds.


    EVENTS

    BIOINFORMATICS FOR MICROBIOME SYMPOSIUM
    Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection

    Multiple Presenters
    May 27, 2016
    8:30 am - 5:00 pm
    Bechtel Conference Center

    IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES
    "Immune responses revealed by multiomics profiling of healthy, disease and dietary perturbations"

    Michael Snyder, Stanford University
    May 31, 2016
    4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
    Alway M106


    RESOURCES

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    STANFORD BIO-X

    OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY LICENSING "TECHFINDER"

    STANFORD CENTER FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    STANFORD BIODESIGN


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X, please email either Dr. Hanwei Li, Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs.

    Release Date: 
    May 25, 2016
  • View this newsletter as displayed over email

    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. The following are key links to the history of Bio-X and the Clark Center (hub of Bio-X): Bio-X Timeline, CLARK CENTER @ 10X, and President John Hennessy's article calling Bio-X and the Clark Center "A Cauldron of Innovation".


     

    CELEBRATING THE CLARK CENTER

    Unlike traditional research buildings that keep disciplines separate, the Clark Center was intended to inspire chance encounters between residents from a mix of disciplines and allow creative science to flourish.


     

    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES GRANTS SYMPOSIUM

    Mark your calendars for
    Wednesday, February 17, 2016,
    Clark Center Auditorium


    NEWS

     
     
     
    WEARABLE DEVICE DETECTS, ANALYZES REAL-TIME CHANGES IN CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SWEAT
     
    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ron Davis

     


     
     
    FEI-FEI LI: HOW DO WE TEACH COMPUTERS TO UNDERSTAND THE VISUAL WORLD?
     
    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Fei-Fei Li

     


     
    LOW-FIBER DIET MAY CAUSE IRREVERSIBLE DEPLETION OF GUT BACTERIA OVER GENERATIONS
     
    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Justin Sonnenburg

     


     
     
    CHEMOTHERAPY MAY BENEFIT SUBGROUP OF STAGE-2 COLON CANCER PATIENTS
     
    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michael Clarke

     


     
     
    TWEAK IN GENE EXPRESSION MAY HAVE HELPED HUMANS WALK UPRIGHT
     
    Research from Bio-X Affiliated Faculty David Kingsley

     


    BIO-X CORE PROGRAMS

     

     

    INTERDISCIPLINARY INITIATIVES SEED GRANTS PROGRAM - Key Stanford initiative that accelerates scientific discovery and innovation and has resulted in 10+ fold return on investment, hundreds of publications, and dozens of patents filed.  Currently awarded to 164 projects over 7 rounds.

     


     

     

    FELLOWSHIPS - Awarded yearly to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty, and has resulted in publications in high-impact journals as well as excellent offers to our Fellows in industry and academia. Currently awarded to 198 Fellows over the past 12 rounds.

     


     

     

    UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - Invaluable opportunity for Stanford undergraduates to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. Currently awarded to 371 Stanford undergraduates over the past 10 rounds.

     


    EVENTS

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES PRE-SEMINAR

     
    Michael Lin, Stanford
    February 9, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    Clark Center S361

     

    FRONTIERS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY BIOSCIENCES SEMINAR

     
    David Schaffer, UC Berkeley
    February 11, 2016
    12:15 pm - 1:00 pm
    Clark Center S360

     

    FRONTIERS IN QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGY SEMINAR

     

     

    Release Date: 
    February 01, 2016
  • Corporate Forum Newsletter banner with date.

    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Bio-X Core Programs

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. Currently, the IIP awards approximately $4 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $200,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the beginning of the seventh round in 2014, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 164 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 750 faculty members, and creating over 700 teams from six different Stanford schools. From just the first 6 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    2014 is the start of the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and 22 newly awarded projects were selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)

    Next week, on Wednesday, August 26, 2015, the next IIP Seed Grant Symposium will be taking place at the Clark Center starting at 1 pm. The agenda is listed below under "EVENTS". Please mark your calendars for this event!
    Bio-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows. The winners of the 2015 PhD Fellowship program will be announced later on this year.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.
    Bio-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program (USRP) supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    This year, nearly 160 students applied to the program, and 65 students were selected. Therefore, to date, 371 awards have been given to the Stanford undergraduate community to participate in the Bio-X Summer Research Program. The program for 2015 officially started last week. In addition, the Bio-X USRP Faculty Talks have begun, and take place every Wednesday from 12-1 pm until August 26, 2015. Please email Hanwei Li to learn more details and RSVP for any of the faculty talks.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. The 2015 posters will be presented during the next Bio-X IIP Seed Grant Symposium on Wednesday, August 26, 2015. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our core programs are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    Bio-X also holds symposiums every year that highlight our core programs. The latest one was on February 25, 2015, where over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects, as well as a packed poster session with 100+ research projects presented. THE NEXT BIO-X IIP SEED GRANT SYMPOSIUM IS TAKING PLACE NEXT WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2015 IN THE CLARK CENTER STARTING AT 1 PM.

    If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.


    News

    Stanford engineers develop a wireless, fully implantable device to stimulate nerves in mice
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ada Poon, Scott Delp, and Karl Deisseroth; Bio-X SIGF Fellow Kate Montgomery, and Bio-X Travel Awardee Logan Grosenick
    Bio-X IIP Seed Grant and NeuroVentures support

    A miniature device that combines optogenetics – using light to control the activity of the brain – with a newly developed technique for wirelessly powering implanted devices is the first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics. The device dramatically expands the scope of research that can be carried out through optogenetics to include experiments involving mice in enclosed spaces or interacting freely with other animals. The work is published in the Aug. 17 edition of Nature Methods. "This is a new way of delivering wireless power for optogenetics," said Ada Poon, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford. "It's much smaller and the mouse can move around during an experiment." The device can be assembled and reconfigured for different uses in a lab, and the plans for the power source are publicly available. "I think other labs will be able to adapt this for their work," Poon said.

     

    Researchers design cheaper, faster, more accurate test to identify gene defects in heart patients
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Joseph Wu and Bio-X Bowes Fellow Kitchener Wilson

    For the subset of heart patients whose illness isn’t caused by a lifetime of cigarettes, trans fats or high glycemic foods, a new genetic test developed at the Stanford University School of Medicine may be able to accurately pinpoint the likely genetic causes of their conditions in just a couple of days. In work that could advance precision health, Kitchener Wilson, MD, PhD, instructor of pathology, and Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and of radiology, teamed up with a group of genome-sequencing specialists to develop the new technique: a better way to test cardiac patients for any genes that might be causing their problems. Wilson and Wu said that the gold standard of genome sequencing involves thousands of genes, costs $1,000 or more and can take weeks or months to get results. For a patient with a heart condition that’s difficult to diagnose, it makes no sense to sequence the entire 22,000-gene genome, since fewer than 200 genes are known to affect the heart, they said. Moreover, whole-genome sequencing typically contains mistakes, so key mutations might be missed. To meet this challenge, Wilson and Wu’s team designed a streamlined assay, or test, that looks at just the 88 genes known to carry mutations that cause heart problems. Materials for the new test cost about $100, and results are back within three days. Wilson and Wu are first and senior authors, respectively, on a paper describing the assay that was published online Aug. 11 in Circulation Research.

     

    Elusive liver stem cell identified in mice by researchers
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Roeland Nusse

    Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a cell type in the liver of mice that can both self-renew and make new liver cells. The discovery solves a long-standing mystery as to how the organ, which is responsible for many metabolic processes, maintains itself when liver cells, most of which are called hepatocytes, grow old and die. “There’s always been a question as to how the liver replaces dying hepatocytes,” said professor of developmental biology Roel Nusse, PhD. “Most other tissues have a dedicated population of cells that can divide to make a copy of themselves, which we call self-renewal, and can also give rise to the more-specialized cells that make up that tissue. But there never was any evidence for a stem cell in the liver.” Researchers have assumed instead that mature hepatocytes would themselves divide to replace a dying neighbor. However, these cells have an abnormal amount of DNA, which would make cell division extremely difficult. Nusse is the senior author of the work, published Aug. 5 in Nature. He is also a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute, the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. First author Bruce Wang, MD, an assistant professor of gastroenterology and hepatology at the University of California-San Francisco, led the research as a visiting scholar in Nusse’s lab.

     

    Bacterial community in pregnant women linked to preterm birth, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty David Relman

    Risk for premature birth is linked to the composition of the vaginal bacterial community in the mother during pregnancy, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine that tracked the body’s microbial communities on a week-by-week basis during pregnancy. A high-diversity pattern in the vaginal bacterial community raised the likelihood of premature birth, and the longer the bacteria followed this pattern, the higher the risk, the study found. The study may also help explain why prematurity risk is elevated in women who have closely spaced pregnancies. A paper describing the research was published online Aug. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Babies born more than three weeks early are considered premature. About 450,000 premature infants are born each year in the United States. Prematurity is the leading cause of newborn deaths. About half of such births occur after spontaneous preterm labor, whose triggers are not well-understood. “We wanted to develop a baseline understanding of what happens to the human microbiome during pregnancy, both in women who deliver healthy, term babies and in those who deliver prematurely,” said the study’s senior author, David Relman, MD, professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology at Stanford, and chief of infectious diseases at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.

     

    Stanford researchers genetically engineer yeast to produce opioids
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Christina Smolke

    For thousands of years, people have used yeast to ferment wine, brew beer and leaven bread. Now researchers at Stanford have genetically engineered yeast to make painkilling medicines, a breakthrough that heralds a faster and potentially less expensive way to produce many different types of plant-based medicines. Writing today in Science, the Stanford engineers describe how they reprogrammed the genetic machinery of baker's yeast so that these fast-growing cells could convert sugar into hydrocodone in just three to five days. Hydrocodone and its chemical relatives such as morphine and oxycodone are opioids, members of a family of painkilling drugs sourced from the opium poppy. It can take more than a year to produce a batch of medicine, starting from the farms in Australia, Europe and elsewhere that are licensed to grow opium poppies. Plant material must then be harvested, processed and shipped to pharmaceutical factories in the United States, where the active drug molecules are extracted and refined into medicines. "When we started work a decade ago, many experts thought it would be impossible to engineer yeast to replace the entire farm-to-factory process," said senior author Christina Smolke, an associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford. Now, though the output is small – it would take 4,400 gallons of bioengineered yeast to produce a single dose of pain relief – the experiment proves that bioengineered yeast can make complex plant-based medicines. "This is only the beginning," Smolke said. "The techniques we developed and demonstrate for opioid pain relievers can be adapted to produce many plant-derived compounds to fight cancers, infectious diseases and chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and arthritis."

     

    Researchers find mutations that contribute to rare blood cancer
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Paul Khavari

    Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a group of mutations responsible for many cases of a rare immune cell cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Identifying the mutations could tip off clinicians to effective treatments for the currently incurable condition. The mutations are found in 15 genes for proteins that work together in a T-cell-survival mechanism. When mutations prevent the mechanism from switching off, the T cells don’t die when they should and actually keep multiplying. The findings were published online Aug. 10 in Nature Genetics. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma — which manifests as rashes, skin tumors and leukemia — doesn’t respond well to traditional chemotherapy, although a technique known as total skin electron radiation that was developed at Stanford can keep the skin disease at bay. Additionally, a new stem cell transplant therapy, also from Stanford, shows promise for long-term remission for those patients with advanced, high-risk disease. The newly identified cancer role of the proteins involved in the cell-survival mechanism suggests new strategies for fighting the disease: Researchers can look for drugs to counter the malfunctioning proteins resulting from the mutations.

     

    Brain scans better forecast math learning in kids than do skill tests, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Vinod Menon

    Brain scans from 8-year-old children can predict gains in their mathematical ability over the next six years, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. The research tracked 43 children longitudinally for six years, starting at age 8, and showed that while brain characteristics strongly indicated which children would be the best math learners over the following six years, the children’s performance on math, reading, IQ and memory tests at age 8 did not. The study, published online Aug. 18 in The Journal of Neuroscience, moves scientists closer to their goal of helping children who struggle to acquire math skills. “We can identify brain systems that support children’s math skill development over six years in childhood and early adolescence,” said the study’s lead author, Tanya Evans, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “A long-term goal of this research is to identify children who might benefit most from targeted math intervention at an early age,” said senior author Vinod Menon, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “Mathematical skills are crucial in our increasingly technological society, and our new data show which brain features forecast future growth in math abilities.”

     

    Stanford researchers unveil virtual reality headset that reduces eye fatigue, nausea
    Electrical Engineering Faculty Gordon Wetzstein

    Try on any virtual reality headset, and within a few minutes the sense of wonder might wear off and leave you with a headache or a topsy-turvy stomach. Computational imaging experts say that's because current virtual reality headsets don't simulate natural 3D images. Now researchers in the Stanford Computational Imaging Group have created a prototype for a next-generation virtual reality headset that uses light-field technology to create a natural, comfortable 3D viewing experience. With help from NVIDIA Corp., their findings will be presented and demonstrated Aug. 9-13 in Los Angeles at SIGGRAPH 2015, a conference that focuses on computer graphics and interactive techniques. In current "flat" stereoscopic virtual reality headsets, each eye sees only one image. Depth of field is also limited as the eye is forced to focus on only a single plane. In the real world, we see slightly different perspectives of the same 3D scene at different positions of our eye's pupil, said Gordon Wetzstein, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford. We also constantly focus on different depths.

     


    Events

    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium

    Wednesday, August 26, 2015
    Clark Center Auditorium
    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program grant awardees will give fifteen-minute presentations at the symposium. A poster session will be held during a post symposium reception, where students involved in interdisciplinary research will present their work.

    1:00pm
    Introduction
    CARLA SHATZ - David Starr Jordan Director of Stanford Bio-X

    1:10pm
    Adaptation of a Miniature Microscope for the Noninvasive In Vivo Detection of Rare Circulating Tumor Cells in the Vasculature
    CHRISTOPHER CONTAG (Pediatrics), Michael Clarke (Oncology), Olav Solgaard (Electrical Engineering)

    1:30pm
    Prediction of Therapeutic Efficacy of Targeted Oncogene Inactivation via PET Imaging Using a Novel Smart Apoptosis Probe ([18F]CAIP)
    DEAN FELSHER (Oncology), Jianghong Rao (Radiology), Frederick Chin (Radiology), David Paik (Radiology)

    1:50pm
    Real Time Biology Cloud Experiments at Scale: Technology Development and Integration in Education
    INGMAR RIEDEL-KRUSE (Bioengineering), Paulo Blikstein (Education)

    2:10pm
    Building Genetic Tools to Engineer Cyanobacteria
    James Swartz (Chemical Engineering), JULIE THERIOT (Biochemistry)

    2:30pm
    Novel Approaches to Antiviral Therapy
    SHIRIT EINAV (Medicine), Stephen Quake (Bioengineering)

    2:50pm
    The Physics of Healthy Embryo Development
    DAVID CAMARILLO (Bioengineering), Renee Reijo Pera (Obstetrics & Gynecology), Barry Behr (Obstetrics & Gynecology)

    3:10pm
    Illuminating the Neural Basis of Risky Choice
    BRIAN KNUTSON (Psychology), Karl Deisseroth (Bioengineering)

    3:30pm
    Developing Targeted Drug Therapies for Brain Tumors
    JENNIFER COCHRAN (Bioengineering), Michelle Monje (Neurology)

    3:50pm
    Closing comments

    4:00pm
    Reception and poster session

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    August 20, 2015
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Bio-X Core Programs

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. Currently, the IIP awards approximately $4 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $200,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the beginning of the seventh round in 2014, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 164 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 750 faculty members, and creating over 700 teams from six different Stanford schools. From just the first 6 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    2014 is the start of the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and 22 newly awarded projects were selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)
    Bio-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows. The winners of the 2015 PhD Fellowship program will be announced later on this year.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.
    Bio-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from the 154 applications submitted in 2014, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program. The winners of the 2015 USRP will be starting their program very soon!

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our core programs are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    Bio-X also holds symposiums every year that highlight our core programs. The latest one was on February 25, 2015, where over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects, as well as a packed poster session with 100+ research projects presented. Please stay tuned for future Bio-X symposiums that are coming up this year!

    If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.


    News

    Just add water: Stanford engineers develop a computer that operates on water droplets
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Manu Prakash

    Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. The computer is nearly a decade in the making, incubated from an idea that struck Prakash when he was a graduate student. The work combines his expertise in manipulating droplet fluid dynamics with a fundamental element of computer science – an operating clock. "In this work, we finally demonstrate a synchronous, universal droplet logic and control," Prakash said. Because of its universal nature, the droplet computer can theoretically perform any operation that a conventional electronic computer can crunch, although at significantly slower rates. Prakash and his colleagues, however, have a more ambitious application in mind. "We already have digital computers to process information. Our goal is not to compete with electronic computers or to operate word processors on this," Prakash said. "Our goal is to build a completely new class of computers that can precisely control and manipulate physical matter. Imagine if when you run a set of computations that not only information is processed but physical matter is algorithmically manipulated as well. We have just made this possible at the mesoscale." The ability to precisely control droplets using fluidic computation could have a number of applications in high-throughput biology and chemistry, and possibly new applications in scalable digital manufacturing. The results are published in the current edition of Nature Physics.

     

    Stanford scientists show fMRI memory detectors can be easily fooled
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Anthony Wagner

    For the past several years, Anthony Wagner has been developing a computer program that can read a person's brain scan data and surmise, with a high degree of certainty, whether that person is experiencing a memory. The technology has great promise to influence a number of fields, including marketing, medicine and evaluation of eyewitness testimony. Now, Wagner, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Stanford, and his colleagues have shown that with just a little bit of coaching and concentration, subjects are easily able to obscure real memories, or even create fibs that look like real memories, on brain scans. The work both confirms the power of the technology when applied to cooperative subjects and underscores the need for more research before applying the science to high-stakes situations. The results are published in the current issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. The act of creating, storing, recalling and replaying a memory is a marvelously complex multi-process biological event. First, the stimulus (a person, an event, etc.) must be sensed, interpreted and stored, each step occurring within different brain structures. Recalling the memory relies on yet another set of neural mechanisms to find the distributed information that constitutes an event memory, reassemble it into a full "story," and then replay it in the mind. Although the process is complex, the fact that different parts of the brain play distinct roles in memory allows neuroscientists like Wagner to pair brain activity signals with machine learning pattern analyses to detect complex patterns that signal whether a person is remembering a target stimulus or perceiving it as novel.

     

    Some heartburn drugs may boost risk of heart attack, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Nigam Shah
    Vascular Surgery and Cardiovascular Medicine Faculty Nicholas Leeper

    A large data-mining study carried out by investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine has linked a popular class of heartburn drugs to an elevated risk of heart attack. Proton-pump inhibitors, or PPIs, are among the world’s most widely prescribed drugs, with $14 billion in annual sales. They are effective at lowering the acidity of the stomach, in turn preventing heartburn, a burning sensation in the chest that occurs when stomach acid rises up into the esophagus. In any given year, more than 20 million Americans — about one in every 14 — use PPIs such as omeprazole (trade name Prilosec) for heartburn, also known as acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease. “The association we found with PPI use and increased chances of a subsequent heart attack doesn’t in and of itself prove causation,” said the study’s lead author, Nigam Shah, PhD, MBBS, an assistant professor of biomedical informatics and assistant director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research. But, he said, the study combed through electronic health records of nearly 3 million people and crunched trillions of pieces of medical data, raising concerns that should be taken seriously, especially now that PPIs are available over the counter. More than 100 million prescriptions are filled every year in the United States for PPIs, a class of drugs long considered benign except for people concurrently taking the blood thinner clopidogrel (Plavix). However, the new study upends this view: It indicates that PPI use was associated with a roughly 20 percent increase in the rate of subsequent heart-attack risk among all adult PPI users, even when excluding those also taking clopidogrel. A paper describing the findings was published June 10 in PLOS ONE.

     

    Scientists find genetic underpinnings of functional brain networks seen in imaging studies
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michael Greicius

    A new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that synchronized physiological interactions between remote brain regions have genetic underpinnings. The research was performed at Stanford but was made possible by collaborations with the Seattle-based Allen Institute for Brain Science and the IMAGEN Consortium, a multicenter European project, said the study’s senior author, Michael Greicius, MD, an associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences. The study was published June 11 in Science. An emerging consensus among neuroscientists is that cognitive operations are performed not by individual brain regions working in isolation, but by networks consisting of several discrete brain regions — anatomically connected either directly via white-matter tracts or indirectly through intermediary nodes — that share “functional connectivity,” meaning that activity in these regions is tightly coupled. Any given functional network is normally most active during the performance of the task associated with that network, as in the case of autobiographical memory (“What did I eat for dinner last night?”). But the synchronous activity of component regions persists when networks are idling. Well over a dozen functional networks have been identified via a technique called resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, said Greicius, who is the medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders. In resting-state fMRI scans, the individual is asked to simply lie still and relax for several minutes. The results of these scans indicate that even at rest, the brain’s functional networks continue to hum along at their own distinguishable frequencies and phases, like different radio stations playing simultaneously, but quietly, on the same radio.

     

    Grippy not sticky: Stanford engineers debut an incredibly adhesive material that doesn't get stuck
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Mark Cutkosky

    A promising new adhesive material was born out of a scrap. David Christensen, a mechanical engineering graduate student at Stanford, was trimming a piece of adhesive modeled after the grippy fingers of geckos, and noticed that the thin scrap seemed particularly grippy. He shared this observation with his colleague Elliot Hawkes, who laminated a piece of non-stretchable, but very flexible, film to the back of the scrap. They found that the combination greatly magnified the grip, and also allowed some surprising properties. "The first time we played with the composite, it was clear the material grabbed onto textures that we were never able to grip before, but doesn't remain stuck," said Christensen, who is advised by Mark Cutkosky, a professor of mechanical engineering. They shared the material with a fellow graduate student, Hao Jiang, and they immediately realized that its ability to grip tightly to any textured surface, yet also release without effort, would make it ideal for a robotic grabber they were working on.


    Events

    Biochemistry
    June 17, 2015, 4 pm - 5 pm
    Munzer Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Biology: How do proteins evolve?
    Speaker: Daniel Tawfik, Weizmann Institute
    Bio-X
    July 16, 2015, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Stanford Bio-X Seminar: "How Experience Changes Synapses in the Mammalian Brain"
    Speaker: Tobias Bonhoeffer, PhD, Stanford, Max Planck Institute, University in Munich

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    June 16, 2015
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.


    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".



    Congratulations to Bio-X Director, Carla Shatz, on the Gruber Prize!

    Carla Shatz, PhD, a Stanford University professor of biology and of neurobiology, was awarded the 2015 Gruber Foundation Neuroscience Prize for her work in understanding how brain signaling controls wiring and plasticity in the brain. Shatz will share the $500,000 prize with Michael Greenberg, PhD, a professor of neurobiology at Harvard. In her research, Shatz, who holds the Sapp Family Provostial Professorship in Neurobiology and the David Starr Jordan Directorship of Stanford Bio-X, has uncovered mechanisms that the brain uses to select which connections to either strengthen or prune back as brain circuits form. She also discovered that well-known proteins, previously associated exclusively with the immune system, play a role in this pruning process. To read more, please click here.



    Bio-X Core Programs

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. Currently, the IIP awards approximately $4 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $200,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the beginning of the seventh round in 2014, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 164 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 750 faculty members, and creating over 700 teams from six different Stanford schools. From just the first 6 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    2014 is the start of the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and 22 newly awarded projects were selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)
    Bio-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows. The winners of the 2015 PhD Fellowship program will be announced later on this year.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.
    Bio-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from the 154 applications submitted in 2014, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program. The winners of the 2015 USRP will be announced very soon!

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our core programs are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    Bio-X also holds symposiums every year that highlight our core programs. The latest one was on February 25, 2015, where over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects, as well as a packed poster session with 100+ research projects presented. Please stay tuned for future Bio-X symposiums that are coming up this year!

    If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.



    News

    Fly-catching robot developed by Stanford scientists speeds biomedical research
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Mark Schnitzer
    Project supported by Stanford Bio-X

    Since the early 20th century, an unheralded star of genetics research has been a small and essentially very annoying creature: the fruit fly. Underlying every significant discovery from fruit fly research – and there have been many, relating to almost every aspect of our own biology – is daily, monotonous time spent by scientists toiling over plastic dishes of conked-out flies. Now a team led by Mark Schnitzer, an associate professor of biology and of applied physics, has introduced a solution to the tedium: a robot that can visually inspect awake flies and, even better, carry out behavioral experiments that were impossible with anesthetized flies. The work is described May 25 in the journal Nature Methods. "Robotic technology offers a new prospect for automated experiments and enables fly researchers to do several things they couldn't do previously," Schnitzer said. "For example, it can do studies with large numbers of flies inspected in very precise ways." The group did one study of 1,000 flies in 10 hours, a task that would have taken much longer for even a highly skilled human.


    Existing drug may treat the deadliest childhood brain tumor, Stanford-led study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michelle Monje

    For the first time, scientists have identified an existing drug that slows the growth of the deadliest childhood brain tumor. The drug restricted the tumor’s growth in a lab dish and improved the survival time of mice that had the tumor implanted into their brains, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at other institutions. The work is noteworthy because the disease, a brain stem cancer called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, is nearly always fatal and lacks an effective treatment. A paper describing the findings were published online May 4 in Nature Medicine. “There have been over 200 clinical trials of chemotherapy drugs for DIPG, and none have shown any survival benefit,” said Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology at Stanford and a senior author of the paper. “But those trials were conducted before we knew anything about the unique biology of this tumor.”


    Tiny spheres of human cells mimic the brain researchers say
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Sergiu Pasca and Ben Barres

    The human brain is a highly organized, three-dimensional mass of cells responsible for our every move, thought and emotion. Snugly housed in the bony confines of the skull, it’s also relatively inaccessible, making it difficult to study. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to generate spherical, free-floating balls of human brain cells that mimic the architecture of the cerebral cortex, the outer layer of brain tissue responsible for how we experience and perceive the world around us and how we interact with others. The spheres contain functional neurons, working synapses and even critical support cells called astrocytes that maintain neural function. They also express genes in patterns similar to a human fetal brain midway through pregnancy. The researchers hope that tracking the development of the cortex-like spheroids over time and observing the interactions of their cells may shed light on human brain development and the molecular causes of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. “One of the major problems in understanding mental disorders is that we can’t directly access the human brain,” said Sergiu Pasca, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “These spheroids closely resemble the three-dimensional architecture of the cortex and have gene-expression patterns that mimic those in a developing fetal brain.”


    Researchers tie unexpected brain structures to creativity — and to stifling it
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Allan Reiss

    Investigators at Stanford University have found a surprising link between creative problem-solving and heightened activity in the cerebellum, a structure located in the back of the brain and more typically thought of as the body’s movement-coordination center. In designing the study, the researchers drew inspiration from the game Pictionary. The cerebellum, traditionally viewed as the brain’s practice-makes-perfect, movement-control center, hasn’t been previously recognized as critical to creativity. The new study, a collaboration between the School of Medicine and Stanford’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, commonly known as the d.school, is the first to find direct evidence that this brain region is involved in the creative process. “Our findings represent an advance in our knowledge of the brain-based physiology of creativity,” said the study’s senior author, Allan Reiss, MD, professor of radiology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. The study, to be published May 28 in Scientific Reports, also suggests that shifting the brain’s higher-level, executive-control centers into higher gear impairs, rather than enhances, creativity. “We found that activation of the brain’s executive-control centers — the parts of the brain that enable you to plan, organize and manage your activities — is negatively associated with creative task performance,” said Reiss, who holds the Howard C. Robbins Professorship in Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences.


    Stanford study on brain waves shows how different teaching methods affect reading development
    Education Faculty Bruce McCandliss

    Beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, instead of trying to learn whole words, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading, according to new Stanford research investigating how the brain responds to different types of reading instruction. In other words, to develop reading skills, teaching students to sound out "C-A-T" sparks more optimal brain circuitry than instructing them to memorize the word "cat." And, the study found, these teaching-induced differences show up even on future encounters with the word. The study, co-authored by Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss of the Graduate School of Education and the Stanford Neuroscience Institute, provides some of the first evidence that a specific teaching strategy for reading has direct neural impact. The research could eventually lead to better-designed interventions to help struggling readers. "This research is exciting because it takes cognitive neuroscience and connects it to questions that have deep meaning and history in educational research," said McCandliss, who wrote the study with Yuliya Yoncheva, a researcher at New York University, and Jessica Wise, a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin.


    New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Zhenan Bao

    Stanford University scientists have created a new carbon material that significantly boosts the performance of energy-storage technologies. Their results are featured on the cover of the journal ACS Central Science. "We have developed a 'designer carbon' that is both versatile and controllable," said Zhenan Bao, the senior author of the study and a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford. "Our study shows that this material has exceptional energy-storage capacity, enabling unprecedented performance in lithium-sulfur batteries and supercapacitors." According to Bao, the new designer carbon represents a dramatic improvement over conventional activated carbon, an inexpensive material widely used in products ranging from water filters and air deodorizers to energy-storage devices.


    Wild chimps teach scientists about gene that encodes HIV-fighting protein
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Peter Parham

    A gene variant in chimpanzees in a Tanzanian wildlife preserve probably protects them from rapidly succumbing to the primate equivalent of HIV, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have discovered. A gene variant is a naturally occurring difference in the DNA sequence of a gene. Part of the chimp variant strongly resembles that of an analogous human variant known to slow the human immunodeficiency virus’ progression to AIDS. The wild chimps inhabit Gombe Stream National Park, a 13.5-square-mile preserve where they have been continuously observed from afar since famed primatologist Jane Goodall, PhD, began monitoring them more than 50 years ago. The gene in question is subject to evolutionary pressures that normally cause it to change rapidly over evolutionary time, resulting in many variants with diverse sequences. So the striking similarity of a section of the chimp and a section of the human variant implies two things, said Peter Parham, PhD, professor of structural biology and of microbiology and immunology. First, hominids have been fighting off HIV-like viruses at least since the two related species diverged some 5 million years ago. Second, because that particular section of the gene variant hasn’t changed much since then, it probably plays an important role in increased survival among those inheriting it. “Only a part of the chimp gene variant’s sequence looks a lot like the human one. That immediately tells us this is the important part of the gene,” said Parham, the senior author of a study describing the findings, published online May 28 in PLOS Biology. Unlocking this sequence’s significance could yield not only biological insights but also pharmaceutical or, someday, perhaps even gene-therapy applications that enhance HIV-infected people’s ability to avoid disease progression to AIDS, he said.


    Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Jelena Vuckovic

    Stanford electrical engineer Jelena Vuckovic wants to make computers faster and more efficient by reinventing how they send data back and forth between chips, where the work is done. In computers today, data is pushed through wires as a stream of electrons. That takes a lot of power, which helps explain why laptops get so warm. "Several years ago, my colleague David Miller carefully analyzed power consumption in computers, and the results were striking," said Vuckovic, referring to electrical engineering Professor David Miller. "Up to 80 percent of the microprocessor power is consumed by sending data over the wires – so-called interconnects." In a Nature Photonics article whose lead author is Stanford graduate student Alexander Piggott, Vuckovic, a professor of electrical engineering, and her team explain a process that could revolutionize computing by making it practical to use light instead of electricity to carry data inside computers.


    Events

    Bio-X
    June 4, 2015, 12 pm - 1:05 pm
    Clark Center S360, Stanford, CA
    Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar: "Membrane Transporters Beyond Crystal Structures: Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Glutamate Transporters"
    Speaker: Olga Boudker, Cornell
    Biochemistry
    June 17, 2015, 4 pm - 5 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Biology: How do proteins evolve?
    Speaker: Daniel Tawfik, Weizmann Institute

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.


    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    June 03, 2015
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Seed Grants

    **UPDATE: BIO-X HAS 22 NEWLY AWARDED IIP SEED GRANT PROJECTS FOR ROUND 7 in 2014!! Click on the link to check out the project descriptions and read on to learn more about this round!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    This year is the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and Bio-X has just announced it's 22 newly awarded projects selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.


    **On August 27, 2014, over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects. In addition, Bio-X had its largest poster session ever with 167 posters presented during the reception of the symposium! If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.


    Fellowships

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.



    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications submitted this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Retinal-scan analysis can predict advance of macular degeneration, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Daniel Rubin
    Bio-X IIP Seed Grant Project: Computerized Quantitative Imaging Assessment of Age-Related Acute Macular Degeneration

    Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found a new way to forecast which patients with age-related macular degeneration are likely to suffer from the most debilitating form of the disease. The new method predicts, on a personalized basis, which patients’ AMD would, if untreated, probably make them blind, and roughly when this would occur. Simply by crunching imaging data that is already commonly collected in eye doctors’ offices, ophthalmologists could make smarter decisions about when to schedule an individual patient’s next office visit in order to optimize the chances of detecting AMD progression before it causes blindness. AMD is the leading cause of blindness and central vision loss among adults older than 65. An estimated 10-15 million people in the United States suffer from the disease, in which the macula — the key area of the retina responsible for vision — shows signs of degeneration. During normal aging, yellowish deposits called drusen form in the retina, which is the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye. As drusen increase in size and number, they eventually begin to damage the light-sensitive cells of the macula. This stage of the disease, called “dry” AMD, can mean blurry central vision and impaired day-to-day activity. While about four of every five people with AMD have the dry form of the disease, it’s the so-called “wet” form that most concerns ophthalmologists, because it accounts for 80-90 percent of all legal blindness associated with the disease. In wet AMD, abnormal blood vessels accumulate underneath the macula and leak blood and fluid. When that happens, irreversible damage to the macula can quickly ensue if not treated quickly. But until now, there has been no effective way to tell which individuals with AMD are likely to progress to the wet stage. Current treatments are costly and invasive — they typically involve injections of medicines directly into the eyeball — making the notion of treating people with early or intermediate stages of AMD a non-starter. Doctors and patients have to hope the next office visit will be early enough to catch wet AMD at its onset, before it takes too great a toll.


    Oxytocin levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid are linked, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Karen Parker
    Bio-X IIP Seed Grant/NeuroVentures Project: Biomarkers of the social deficits of children with autism

    For years, scientists have debated how best to assess brain levels of oxytocin, a hormone implicated in social behaviors. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found the first direct evidence in children that blood oxytocin measurements are tightly linked to levels of oxytocin in cerebrospinal fluid, which bathes the brain. Low oxytocin levels in blood and CSF are both correlated to high anxiety levels, the research also showed. The findings were published online Nov. 4 in Molecular Psychiatry. “So many psychiatric disorders involve disruptions to social functioning,” said the study’s senior author, Karen Parker, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “This study helps scientifically validate the use of measuring oxytocin in the blood, and suggests that oxytocin may be a biomarker of anxiety. It raises the possibility that oxytocin could be considered as a therapeutic target across a variety of psychiatric disorders.”


    Stanford engineers discover how to record the forensic history of chemical contaminations in water
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Sindy Tang

    Stanford engineers have invented a device that can record when chemicals appear in water and in what concentration, without electronics, creating a simple and inexpensive sensor to find unknown sources of contaminations in streams. Sindy K.Y. Tang, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, described what she calls her time capsule technology in a paper in the journal Lab on a Chip. The time capsule captures a visible record of chemical reactions, like a barcode, that can be scanned to reveal when the reaction occurred and how much of a specific chemical was present. "We record the forensic history of chemical reactions," Tang said. Because the time capsule has no mechanical or electrical parts, it uses no electricity and requires no batteries. That feature allows Tang to make devices that are smaller and cheaper than current sensors. Now she plans to make her prototype smaller and extend the range of reactions it can record to open up new uses such as studying geothermal or petroleum reservoirs deep underground – places where pressure and temperature could destroy conventional electronic sensors.


    New way of genome editing could cure hemophilia in mice; may be safer than older method, study shows
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Mark Kay

    The ability to pop a working copy of a faulty gene into a patient’s genome is a tantalizing goal for many clinicians treating genetic diseases. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a new way to carry out this genetic sleight of hand. The approach differs from that of other hailed techniques because it doesn’t require the co-delivery of an enzyme called an endonuclease to clip the recipient’s DNA at specific locations. It also doesn’t rely on the co-insertion of genetic “on” switches called promoters to activate the new gene’s expression. These differences may make the new approach both safer and longer-lasting. Using the technique, the Stanford researchers were able to cure mice with hemophilia by inserting a gene for a clotting factor missing in the animals. “It appears that we may be able to achieve lifelong expression of the inserted gene, which is particularly important when treating genetic diseases like hemophilia and severe combined immunodeficiency,” said Mark Kay, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics and of genetics. “We’re able to do this without using promoters or nucleases, which significantly reduces the chances of cancers that can result if the new gene inserts itself at random places in the genome.” Using the technique, Kay and his colleagues were able to insert a working copy of a missing blood-clotting factor into the DNA of mice with hemophilia. Although the insertion was accomplished in only about 1 percent of liver cells, those cells made enough of the missing clotting factor to ameliorate the disorder. Kay is the senior author of the research, published Oct. 29 in Nature. The lead author is postdoctoral scholar Adi Barzel, PhD.


    New molecular imaging technology could improve bladder-cancer detection, researchers say
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Joseph Liao and Irv Weissman

    Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a new strategy that they say could detect bladder cancer with more accuracy and sensitivity than standard endoscopy methods. Endoscopy refers to a procedure in which surgeons use an instrument equipped with a lens to see inside the patient. The researchers identified a protein known as CD47 as a molecular imaging target to distinguish bladder cancer from benign tissues. In the future, this technique could improve bladder cancer detection, guide more precise cancer surgery and reduce unnecessary biopsies, therefore increasing cancer patients’ quality of life. The work is described in a paper published Oct. 29 in Science Translational Medicine. Bladder cancer, the fifth most common cancer in the United States, is generally identified in the clinic by a procedure called cystoscopy, an endoscopy in the bladder. Then in the operating room, surgeons remove the cancerous tissue for biopsy.


    Events

    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)
    Nov 13, 2014, 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    Beckman Munzer Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    CCNE Nano-Bio Seminar Series: "Highly Fluorescent Semiconducting Polymer Dots for Biology and Medicine"
    Speaker: Daniel T. Chiu, PhD, Univ. of Washington
    Bioengineering
    Nov 13, 2014, 11 am - 12 pm
    Clark Center S360, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Series
    Speaker: Suzanne Gaudet, Harvard Med School
    Stanford Bio-X
    Nov 17, 2014, 12 pm - 1:05 pm
    Clark Center S361, Stanford, CA
    Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar (in anticipation of Dr. Lior Pachter's seminar on Nov 20)
    Speaker: Julia Salzman, PhD, Stanford
    Stanford Bio-X
    Nov 20, 2014, 12 pm - 1:05 pm
    Clark Center S360, Stanford, CA
    Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar, "Recent Developments in RNA-Seq"
    Speaker: Lior Pachter, PhD, UCB

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    November 12, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Nobel Prize for Stanford chemist W.E. Moerner!!

    Congratulations to W.E. Moerner, the Harry S. Mosher Professor of Chemistry at Stanford, who was awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on microscopy techniques that allow scientists to visualize precise molecular mechanisms inside living cells. "The path-breaking work of Professor Moerner and his colleagues has made a major contribution to our ability to observe molecules at the smallest scales, opening up new possibilities for discovery in areas ranging from disease management to drug development," Stanford President John L. Hennessy said. "The Nobel Prize recognizes this remarkable work, of which all of us in the Stanford community are immensely proud."Click here to read the news on Prof. Moerner's award!

    W.E. Moerner is also a Bio-X affiliated faculty member who has received 2 Bio-X IIP Seed Grant awards for: "Single-molecule probes of chaperone-assisted folding" in 2000 and "Single molecule and high-resolution imaging of developmental signal transducers" in 2012. He has a Bio-X Graduate Fellow, Lucien Weiss, whose work is titled "Intracellular transport and trafficking in hedgehog signal transduction".


    Seed Grants

    **UPDATE: BIO-X HAS JUST ANNOUNCED ITS 22 NEWLY AWARDED IIP SEED GRANT PROJECTS OF ROUND 7!! Click on the link to check out the project descriptions and read on to learn more about this round!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    This year is the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and Bio-X has just announced it's 22 newly awarded projects selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    **On August 27, 2014, over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects. In addition, Bio-X had its largest poster session ever with 167 posters presented during the reception of the symposium! If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.


    Fellowships

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.



    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications submitted this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Decoy drug developed by Stanford Bio-X scientists allows brains of adult mice to form new connections
    Bio-X Director Carla Shatz

    At critical times in the brain's development, windows open when neurons can reach out and form new connections. The language window, for example, is open in time for kids to learn multiple languages and speak them like a native. Then it mostly closes, leaving adults fumbling for words and unable to roll their 'R's. The question has been what controls that window, and, more to the point, what can be done to prop it open later in life. Knowing that could do more than simply help older people with a travel bug. It could allow the brain to recover from stroke, some forms of blindness, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions that result from the loss of connections in the brain and an inability to form many new ones. Now a team of scientists at Stanford University has found that disabling the function of a single protein for as little as a week allows the brains of adult mice to form new connections, called synapses. "To me, this is amazing because what this is saying is that it is possible to induce new synapses in adult brains," said Carla Shatz, the David Starr Jordan Director of Stanford Bio-X, which supports interdisciplinary biomedical research. Shatz was senior author on a research paper describing this work, published Oct. 15 in Science Translational Medicine.


    Miniature wireless device being developed by Stanford Bio-X team creates better way of studying chronic pain
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ada Poon, Scott Delp, and David Clark
    Bio-X 2014 IIP Seed Grant Project
    Bio-X Fellow Kathryn Montgomery

    Ada Poon, a Stanford assistant professor of electrical engineering, is a master at building miniscule wireless devices that function in the body and can be powered remotely. Now, she and collaborators in bioengineering and anesthesia want to leverage this technology to develop a way of studying – and eventually developing treatments for – pain. Chronic pain costs the economy $600 billion a year and the two most common treatments have significant drawbacks: narcotics are addictive and surgery is costly and carries considerable risks. "Many people simply can't find a medication or technique to control their pain, despite all the approaches available," said David Clark, a professor of anesthesiology and pain management who treats patients with chronic pain in his medical practice. "Most people don't even achieve 50 percent pain control." The collaboration builds on work by Scott Delp, professor of bioengineering and mechanical engineering, and his students Kate Montgomery, who is a Bio-X fellow, and Shrivats Iyer. They developed a way of using light to control the activity of neurons that transmit pain, taking advantage of a technique called optogenetics. One color of light stopped the nerve from firing and prevented pain. Another color caused the nerve to fire.


    Stanford engineers develop tiny, sound-powered chip to serve as medical device
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Amin Arbabian and Butrus (Pierre) Khuri-Yakub

    Medical researchers would like to plant tiny electronic devices deep inside our bodies to monitor biological processes and deliver pinpoint therapies to treat illness or relieve pain. But so far engineers have been unable to make such devices small and useful enough. Providing electric power to medical implants has been one stumbling block. Using wires or batteries to deliver power tends to make implants too big, too clumsy – or both. Now, Stanford engineers are developing a way to send power – safely and wirelessly – to "smart chips" programmed to perform medical tasks and report back the results. Their approach involves beaming ultrasound at a tiny device inside the body designed to do three things: convert the incoming sound waves into electricity; process and execute medical commands; and report the completed activity via a tiny built-in radio antenna. "We think this will enable researchers to develop a new generation of tiny implants designed for a wide array of medical applications," said Amin Arbabian, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford. Arbabian's team recently presented a working prototype of this wireless medical implant system at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference in San Jose.


    Drug may prevent development of invasive bladder cancer, researchers say
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Philip Beachy

    A drug already approved for use in humans may prevent invasive bladder cancer, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The drug, FK506, is commonly used to suppress the immune system in organ transplant recipients to combat rejection. The researchers found that low doses of FK506, also known as tacrolimus, prevented the development of invasive bladder cancer in 10 out of 10 laboratory mice that were given a carcinogen over five months. In contrast, seven of nine control mice developed invasive cancers during the same time period. “This could be a boon to the management of bladder cancer patients,” said Philip Beachy, PhD, professor of biochemistry and of developmental biology at Stanford and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. “Bladder cancer is the most expensive cancer to treat per patient because most patients require continual monitoring. The effective prevention of progression to invasive carcinoma would be a major advance in the treatment of this disease.” Beachy is the Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine and a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute and the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. He is the senior author of the study, published Oct. 13 in Cancer Cell. Former postdoctoral scholar Kunyoo Shin, PhD, and former graduate student Agnes Lim, PhD, are the lead authors.


    Events

    Bio-X
    October 20, 2014, 12 pm - 1:05 pm
    Clark Center S361, Stanford, CA
    Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar
    Speaker: William Greenleaf, PhD, Stanford University
    Biology
    Oct 20, 2014, 4 pm - 5:30 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    "New Protein Engineered Tools for Signaling"
    Speaker: Jim Wells, PhD, UCSF
    Cardiovascular Institute
    October 21, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    LKSC Rm 120, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Science: "Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Medicine and Drug Development"
    Speaker: Jonathan R. Lindner, MD, OHSU
    Bio-X
    Oct 23, 2014, 12 pm - 1:05 pm
    Clark Center S360, Stanford, CA
    Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar: "Regulation of the 3D Genome"
    Speaker: Bing Ren, PhD, UCSD
    BIO-X SYMPOSIUM - MECHANOBIOLOGY: PUSHING AND PULLING ON LIFE

    Thursday, November 6, 2014
    Clark Center Auditorium
    This Symposium aims to educate students, postdoctoral fellows and established scientists from different disciplines about Mechanobiology by presenting talks on sensory systems, mechanically mediated cellular signaling, and the role of mechanics in homeostasis. Topics include mechanisms, methods and mechanical pathways ranging in temporal and spatial scales from ion channels and protein conformational changes to cell and tissue mechanics in growth, differentiation, disease and regeneration. The Symposium features invited speakers, talks from postdoctoral fellows selected from submitted abstracts, a networking lunch, and poster reception.

    9:00am
    Welcome and Introduction

    9:15am
    Chemomechanical Markers and Modulators of Stem Cells: Pulling It All Together
    Krystyn Van Vliet, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    10:00am
    Chromosome Segregation: Mechanical Integrity with Dynamic Parts
    Sophie Dumont, University of California, San Francisco

    10:45am
    Coffee Break

    11:15am
    Postdoctoral Fellows Talks

    12:30pm
    Lunch - Students may register in advance for lunch with faculty

    1:45pm
    Touch As a Matter of Fat and Mechanics
    Miriam Goodman, Stanford University

    2:30pm
    A Leaky Pipeline: Matrix Mechanics in Vascular Form and Function
    Cindy Reinhart-King, Cornell University

    3:15pm
    Coffee Break

    3:45pm
    Mechanical Regulation of Cell Adhesion and Migration
    Margaret Gardel, The University of Chicago

    4:30pm-6:00pm
    Poster Session and Refreshments

    Symposium Organizers: Beth Pruitt (ME, MCP by courtesy, Bio-X) and W. James Nelson (Biology, MCP, Bio-X)

    To RSVP, please go here

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    October 16, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Seed Grants

    **UPDATE: BIO-X HAS JUST ANNOUNCED ITS 22 NEWLY AWARDED IIP SEED GRANT PROJECTS OF ROUND 7!! Click on the link to check out the project descriptions and read on to learn more about this round!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    This year is the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants Program, and Bio-X has just announced it's 22 newly awarded projects selected from 142 Letters of Intent (LOIs)! This has been the largest number of LOIs that Bio-X has received. Please go here to check out the newly awarded projects. Competition was intense, and the selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and new interdisciplinary collaborations. (To view the 142 other IIP projects that have been funded from the previous 6 rounds, please click here.)

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    **On August 27, 2014, over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects. In addition, Bio-X had its largest poster session ever with 167 posters presented during the reception of the symposium! If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.


    Fellowships

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees of 2014, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.



    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications submitted this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Optogenetics earns Stanford professor Karl Deisseroth the Keio prize in medicine
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Karl Deisseroth

    Today optogenetics is a widely accepted technology for probing the inner workings of the brain, but a decade ago it was the source of some anxiety for then assistant professor of bioengineering Karl Deisseroth. Deisseroth had sunk most of the funds he'd been given to start his lab at Stanford into a crazy idea – that with a little help from proteins found in pond scum he could turn neurons on and off in living animals, using light. If it didn't work he'd be out of funds with no published research, and likely looking for a new job. Luckily, it worked, and has just earned Deisseroth, now the D. H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral science, the 2014 Keio Medical Science Prize. Thousands of labs around the world are now using optogenetics to understand and develop treatments for diseases of the brain and mental health conditions and to better understand the complex wiring of our brains. ... Decades ago, when teams of scientists began studying the light-sensitive proteins within microbes it wasn't with an eye toward one day helping people with depression, Parkinson's disease or untreatable pain. It was to better understand the intricate and amazing world around us. The research was fueled by pure scientific curiosity. Curiosity that has, as it happens, led to a discovery that might just help people. Deisseroth argued in a Scientific American piece about the importance of funding curiosity-driven research as opposed to more targeted disease-focus research that some scientists and funding agencies have advocated. ... He argues that funding agencies need to not only support fundamental research, but also facilitate the translation of that basic research into the work that can one day help patients. "This is something that Bio-X does well," Deisseroth said. He works in the Clark Center that houses Bio-X, where scientists from very different backgrounds work elbow to elbow. "They put people who come from different perspectives within shouting distance of each other so those leaps can happen," he said. Bio-X has provided seed funding for a number of optogenetics collaborations and also supports the optogenetics core, where scientists can learn how to employ the technique in their own labs.

     

    Stanford bioengineer among Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10”
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Manu Prakash

    Manu Prakash, PhD, a prolific inventor of low-cost scientific tools, has been named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10” for 2014 – an award that recognizes the nation’s brightest young minds in science and engineering. In the last year Prakash has introduced two novel science tools made from everyday materials.The first was a fully functional paper microscope, which costs less than a dollar in materials, that can be used for diagnosing blood-borne diseases such as malaria, African sleeping sickness and Chagas. It can also be used by children — our future scientists — to explore and learn from the microscopic world. The second was a $5 programmable kid’s chemistry set, inspired by hand-crank music boxes. Like a music box, users crank a wheel that feeds a strip of hole-punched paper through the mechanism. When a pin hits a hole, it activates a pump that releases a precise, time-sequenced drop of a liquid onto a surface. This low-cost device can be used to test water quality, to provide affordable medical diagnostic tests, or to design chemistry experiments in schools.

     

    Stanford bioengineers develop a toolkit for designing more successful synthetic molecules
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Christina Smolke

    Ever since Robert Hooke first described cells in 1665, scientists have been trying to figure out what is going on inside. One of the most exciting modern techniques involves injecting cells with synthetic genetic molecules that can passively report on the cell's behavior, or even alter its function. A new computer model developed by Stanford engineers could not only improve the sensitivity and success of these synthetic molecules, but also make them easier to design in the first place. The work is detailed in the current issue of Nature Methods. Typically, scientists have built synthetic molecules through trial and error. This approach has allowed some interesting developments, said Christina Smolke, senior author on the paper and an associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford, but it inhibits forward engineering approaches, which ultimately limits the potential of the tool. "You start with an idea of what you want to do in the cell, and then you build and iterate on a design over and over until you reach something close to what you want," Smolke said. "As we design and build more sophisticated systems, we will want the ability to efficiently achieve precise quantitative behaviors, and being able to accurately predict relationships between the system inputs and outputs are important to achieving this goal."

     

    UV light can turn gene into source of skin cancers, researchers find
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Paul Khavari

    A genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely the driving force behind millions of human skin cancers, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The mutation occurs in a gene called KNSTRN, which is involved in helping cells divide their DNA equally during cell division. Genes that cause cancer when mutated are known as oncogenes. Although KNSTRN hasn’t been previously implicated as a cause of human cancers, the research suggests it may be one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in the world. “This previously unknown oncogene is activated by sunlight and drives the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas,” said Paul Khavari, MD, PhD, the Carl J. Herzog Professor in Dermatology in the School of Medicine and chair of the Department of Dermatology. “Our research shows that skin cancers arise differently from other cancers, and that a single mutation can cause genomic catastrophe.” Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cancer in humans. More than 1 million new cases are diagnosed globally each year. The researchers found that a particular region of KNSTRN is mutated in about 20 percent of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and in about 5 percent of melanomas. A paper describing the research was published online Sept. 7 in Nature Genetics. Khavari, who is also a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute and chief of the dermatology service at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, is the senior author of the paper. Postdoctoral scholar Carolyn Lee, MD, PhD, is the lead author.

     

    Stanford scientists map white matter connections within the human brain
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Brian Wandell

    To see, think or feel, the 100 billion neurons in our brain must exchange messages. These are transmitted over some 100 trillion specialized connections, known collectively as the "connectome." Most connections are extremely short, carrying information a few hundred-thousandths of an inch between nearby neurons. But many important connections are much longer, winding as much as a foot from one end of the brain to the other. Scientists at Stanford University have developed a mathematical and computational technology that allows researchers to more accurately map the large, long connections within the white matter tissue of living human brains. The methodology is called LiFE, for linear fascicle evaluation. The work is detailed online in Nature Methods.


    Events

    Neurology and Neurosciences
    September 19, 2014, 8 am - 9 am
    LKSC Rm 130, Stanford, CA
    "Multiple Sclerosis/Neuromyelitis Optica"
    Speaker: Claudia Lucchinetti, Univ. of Rochester SOM
    Biology
    Sept 22, 2014, 4 pm - 5:30 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    "PARPs function as key regulators of protein and mRNA homeostasis"
    Speaker: Paul Chang, MIT/ Koch Institute
    Cardiovascular Institute
    September 23, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    LKSC Rm 120, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Science: "Experiences in Drug Discovery"
    Speaker: P. Roy Vagelos, Retired Chairman & Chief Executive Officer of Merck & Co. Inc.
    Stanford Neurosciences Institute
    Oct 9-10, 2014
    Mackenzie Room, Huang Engineering Building, Stanford, CA
    SNI Inaugural Symposium
    Speakers: Ann Arvin, John Rogers, Bruce Rosen, Corinna Darian-Smith, Thomas Insel, Carla Shatz, Karl Deisseroth, Nita Farahany, Thomas Südhof, John Hennessy, William Newsome

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu

    Release Date: 
    September 18, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Seed Grants

    **UPDATE: Last week on August 27, 2014, over 300 people attended Bio-X's latest Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium. There were 8 different oral presentations from faculty members who were awarded Bio-X Seed Grants on the progress that they have made with the funding towards their projects. In addition, Bio-X had its largest poster session ever with 167 posters presented during the reception of the symposium! If you'd like to learn more about any of the projects that were presented during the entire symposium, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li with your questions.

    **UPDATE: The awardees of the 7th round of the Bio-X IIP Seed Grants will be announced soon after review of the 141 Letters of Intent has been completed. Stay tuned for the announcement!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    In 2012, Stanford Bio-X selected 23 new seed grant projects as the winners of the 6th round. Please go here to view the list of awardees, along with the titles of their projects and the abstracts of the research. Competition was intense as the awardees were chosen from 118 Letters of Intent (LOIs). Selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and interdisciplinary collaboration. (To view the 114 other IIP projects that have been funded from the first 5 rounds, please click here.) In addition, SANOFI has also funded 4 new Bio-X IIP Seed Grant projects from round 6!

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.


    Fellowships

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has recently announced its 19 new fellows for the 10th year of the Bio-X Fellowships!!

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.



    **UPDATE: The 9th annual Bio-X USRP was completed last week. The program ended with poster presentations from the 65 participating undergraduates on their summer's research, and this took place during last week's Bio-X IIP Seed Grant Symposium.

    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Stanford scientists reveal complexity in the brain’s wiring diagram
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Karl Deisseroth and John Huguenard
    Bio-X Fellow Joanna Mattis and Postdoc Scholar Julia Brill

    When Joanna Mattis started her doctoral project she expected to map how two regions of the brain connect. Instead, she got a surprise. It turns out the wiring diagram shifts depending on how you flip the switch. "There's a lot of excitement about being able to make a map of the brain with the idea that if we could figure out how it is all connected we could understand how it works," Mattis said. "It turns out it's so much more dynamic than that." Mattis is a co-first author on a paper describing the work published August 27 in the Journal of Neuroscience. Julia Brill, then a postdoctoral scholar, was the other co-first author. Mattis had been a graduate student in the lab of Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, where she helped work on a new technique called optogenetics. That technique allows neuroscientists to selectively turn parts of the brain on and off to see what happens. She wanted to use optogenetics to understand the wiring of a part of the brain involved in spatial memory – it's what makes a mental map of your surroundings as you explore a new city, for example.


    New drug promises relief for inflammatory pain, scientists say
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Pain from inflammation sidelines thousands of Americans each year. Many face a tough choice: deal with the pain, take a potentially addictive opioid or use a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that may increase risk for cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal bleeding. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a compound thought to be nonaddictive and safe for the heart and gastrointestinal system that reduces inflammatory pain in mice and rats. They call the compound Alda-1. “Finding a new pain medication is important because we need a safer drug; there are 17,000 deaths from prescription opiate overdoses a year alone,” said Daria Mochly-Rosen, professor of chemical and systems biology. A paper describing the researchers’ findings published Aug. 27 in Science Translational Medicine. Mochly-Rosen is senior author of the paper, and former Stanford postdoctoral scholars Vanessa Zambelli, PhD, and Eric Gross, MD, PhD, are the lead authors.


    Stanford scientists develop water splitter that runs on ordinary AAA battery
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Hongjie Dai

    In 2015, American consumers will finally be able to purchase fuel cell cars from Toyota and other manufacturers. Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most of the cars will run on hydrogen made from natural gas, a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming. Now scientists at Stanford University have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. The battery sends an electric current through two electrodes that split liquid water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron. "Using nickel and iron, which are cheap materials, we were able to make the electrocatalysts active enough to split water at room temperature with a single 1.5-volt battery," said Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford. "This is the first time anyone has used non-precious metal catalysts to split water at a voltage that low. It's quite remarkable, because normally you need expensive metals, like platinum or iridium, to achieve that voltage." In addition to producing hydrogen, the novel water splitter could be used to make chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide, an important industrial chemical, according to Dai. He and his colleagues describe the new device in a study published in the Aug. 22 issue of the journal Nature Communications.


    Humans, flies, worms: Researchers work to understand gene expression across organisms
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michael Snyder

    Fruit flies and roundworms have long been used as model organisms to learn more about human biology and disease. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that although many aspects of regulatory networks are conserved among the three distantly related organisms, other differences have emerged over evolutionary time. These differences may explain why, for example, worms slither, flies fly and humans walk on two legs, even though they all use the same basic genetic building blocks. “We’re trying to understand the basic principles that govern how genes are turned on and off,” said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics at Stanford. “The worm and the fly have been the premier model organisms in biology for decades, and have provided the foundation for much of what we’ve learned about human biology. If we can learn how the rules of gene expression evolved over time, we can apply that knowledge to better understand human biology and disease.” The research was conducted as part of a multi-institutional collaborative effort to understand more about how organisms control the expression of their genes to generate neurons, muscles, skin, blood and all of the other types of cells and tissues necessary for complex life — all at the exactly right time and place in the body.


    Events

    Neurology and Neurosciences
    September 8, 2014, 4 pm - 5 pm
    Munzer Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Aging Seminar Series: "Neural control of aging in Drosophila"
    Speaker: Scott Pletcher, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Michigan
    Cardiovascular Institute
    Sept 9, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Li Ka Shing Center, LKSC 120, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Science: "Guidelines, Cardiovascular Health, and the Public"
    Speaker: Howard Bachner, MD, Editor-in-chief, JAMA
    Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS)
    Sept 11, 2014, 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    Munzer Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    CCNE Nano-Bio Seminar Series: "Integration of Paper Microfluidic Methods for Detection of Infectious Diseases for Low Resource Settings"
    Speaker: Paul Yager, PhD, Professor, Dept. of Bioengineering, Univ. of Washington
    Radiology
    September 18, 2014, 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    Li Ka Shing Center, LKSC 130, Stanford, CA
    CME Radiology Grand Rounds: "The Physis and Metaphysis: Where Everything Happens in a Child's Bone"
    Speaker: Diego Jaramillo, MD, MPH, Professor of Radiology, Perelman SOM at the Univ. of Penn.

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    September 03, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Seed Grants

    **SAVE THE DATE: The next Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initatives Seed Grants Program Symposium is taking place on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 in the Clark Center Auditorium from 1-4 pm, followed by a poster session of various research within the Bio-X community during the reception in the Courtyard. Go below to EVENTS or click here to view the entire agenda with 8 oral presentations on awarded Bio-X Seed Grant projects.

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has closed the 7th RFP for its IIP Seed Grants, and review of the 141 Letters of Intent is underway!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    In 2012, Stanford Bio-X selected 23 new seed grant projects as the winners of the 6th round. Please go here to view the list of awardees, along with the titles of their projects and the abstracts of the research. Competition was intense as the awardees were chosen from 118 Letters of Intent (LOIs). Selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and interdisciplinary collaboration. (To view the 114 other IIP projects that have been funded from the first 5 rounds, please click here.) In addition, SANOFI has also funded 4 new Bio-X IIP Seed Grant projects from round 6!

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.


    IIP Seed Grants-Related Events

    ** On Monday, March 3, 2014, Bio-X had a Poster Session, featuring 105 different posters from research by all scientists within the Stanford Bio-X community. Over 250 people attended the session, which allowed for an excellent venue to discuss science and research with colleagues from both academia and industry.

    ** On Monday, August 26, 2013, Bio-X had its second annual IIP Symposium of the year at the Clark Center, which highlights projects that exemplify the Stanford Bio-X mission of crossing boundaries to bring about interdisciplinary research and solutions in the field of life bioscience. The symposium was a huge success with over 300 people attending this event, which included 8 oral presentations and 136 poster presentations. Recorded talks from the symposium will be uploaded soon. If you'd like to view the talks for previous symposia through the years, please click here.


    Fellowships

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has recently announced its 19 new fellows for the 10th year of the Bio-X Fellowships!!

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 174 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.


    **UPDATE: The 9th annual Bio-X USRP is currently underway with this year's 65 new awardees!!

    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Researchers invent nanotech microchip to diagnose type-1 diabetes
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Brian Feldman and Hongjie Dai
    Bio-X SIGF Fellow Bo Zhang

    An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device’s inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Described in a paper published online July 13 in Nature Medicine, the test employs nanotechnology to detect type-1 diabetes outside hospital settings. The handheld microchips distinguish between the two main forms of diabetes mellitus, which are both characterized by high blood-sugar levels but have different causes and treatments. Until now, making the distinction has required a slow, expensive test available only in sophisticated health-care settings. The researchers are seeking Food and Drug Administration approval of the device. “With the new test, not only do we anticipate being able to diagnose diabetes more efficiently and more broadly, we will also understand diabetes better — both the natural history and how new therapies impact the body,” said Brian Feldman, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatric endocrinology and the Bechtel Endowed Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine. Feldman, the senior author of the paper, is also a pediatric endocrinologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.


    Drew Endy discusses what bioengineers should be vibrating about
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Drew Endy

    In a talk at TEDx Stanford, Drew Endy, associate professor of bioengineering talks about the potential of bioengineering and the challenge of deciding how to use it. Endy is a member of the faculty of the Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research teams pioneered the redesign of genomes and invented the transcriptor, a simple DNA element that allows living cells to implement Boolean logic. In 2013, President Barack Obama recognized Endy for his work with the BioBricks Foundation to bootstrap a free-touse language for programming life. He has been working with designers, social scientists and others to transcend the industrialization of nature, recently co-authoring Synthetic Aesthetics (MIT Press, 2014).


    Stanford team aims to improve storage in batteries used in cellphones, iPods, more
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Yi Cui

    Tucked in a small laboratory at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a team of engineers and scientists from the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) is making and testing new types of lithium-ion batteries. Their goal: move beyond today's lithium-ion to create a battery five times better than those we use now. Lithium-ion batteries work by moving lithium ions back and forth between two electrodes, called the cathode and anode (familiar to most as the "+" and "-" sides of a battery). Charging forces the ions into the anode, storing energy to power a wide range of devices. Discharging moves the ions back to the cathode. The maximum amount of lithium absorbed by the electrodes determines a battery’s storage capacity. The lab at SLAC is led by Yi Cui, an associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering at SLAC, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR). Cui believes one key to creating a better battery is making the cathode of sulfur instead of today’s lithium-cobalt oxide.


    Stanford engineers envision an electronic switch just three atoms thick
    Materials Science and Engineering Faculty Evan Reed

    Do not fold, spindle or mutilate. Those instructions were once printed on punch cards that fed data to mainframe computers. Today’s smart phones process more data, but they still weren’t built for being shoved into back pockets. In the quest to build gadgets that can survive such abuse, engineers have been testing electronic systems based on new materials that are both flexible and switchable – that is, capable of toggling between two electrical states: on-off, one-zero, the binary commands that can program all things digital. Now three Stanford researchers believe that they’ve discovered just such a flexible, switchable material. It is a crystal that can form a paper-like sheet just three atoms thick. Computer simulations show that this crystalline lattice has the remarkable ability to behave like a switch: it can be mechanically pulled and pushed, back and forth, between two different atomic structures – one that conducts electricity well, the other that does not. “Think of it like flicking a light switch on and off,” says Karel-Alexander Duerloo, a Stanford Engineering graduate student and first author of an article in Nature Communications. So far this discovery only exists as a simulation. But co-author and team leader Evan Reed, an assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, hopes this work will inspire experimental scientists to fabricate this super-thin crystal and use it to create electronic and other devices that would be as light and flexible as fibers.


    Events

    Neurology & Neurosciences
    July 25, 2014, 8 am - 9 am
    LKSC Rm 130, Stanford, CA
    "Women and Epilepsy"
    Speaker: Kimford Meador, MD
    Pathology
    August 12, 2014, 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
    Alway, M-106, Stanford, CA
    "Computational Pathology for Systematic and Integrative Analyses of Carcinogenesis"
    Speaker: Andrew Beck, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium

    Wednesday, August 27, 2014
    Clark Center Auditorium
    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program grant awardees will give fifteen-minute presentations at the symposium. A poster session will be held during a post symposium reception, where students involved in interdisciplinary research will present their work.

    1:00pm
    Introduction

    1:10pm
    Biomarkers of the Social Deficits of Children with Autism
    KAREN PARKER (Psychiatry)
    Antonio Hardan (Psychiatry)
    Joshua Elias (Chemical & System Biology)
    Sonia Partap(Neurology)

    1:30pm
    Pluridirectional High-energy Agile Scanning Electron Radiotherapy (PHASER): A Novel Design for Radiation Treatment of Cancer
    PETER MAXIM (Radiation Oncology)
    Billy Loo (Radiation Oncology)
    Sami Tantawi (SLAC)

    1:50pm
    Visualizing the Molecular Processes of the Retina in Living Subjects
    ADAM DE LA ZERDA (Structural Biology)
    Mark Blumenkranz (Ophthalmology)

    2:10pm
    Single Molecule and High-Resolution Imaging of Developmental Signal Transducers
    W.E. MOERNER (Chemistry)
    Matthew Scott (Developmental Biology)

    2:30pm
    Developing Biomimetic Hydrogels to Enhance Pluripotent Stem Cell-based Therapy for Smooth Muscle Tissue Repair
    FAN YANG (Orthopaedic Surgery)
    Renee Reijo Pera (Obstetrics and Gynecology)
    Bertha Chen (Obstetrics and Gynecology)

    2:50pm
    Real-time Measurements of Biological Interactions using Multiplexed Peptide Arrays on Silicon Wafer
    PJ UTZ (Medicine)
    Shan Xiang Wang (Electrical Engineering)

    3:10pm
    Engineering the Outside of the Cell from Within: Cytoskeletal Control of Cell Wall Structure and Mechanics
    KC HUANG (Bioengineering)
    Wolf Frommer (Biology)
    David Ehrhardt (Plant Biology)

    3:30pm
    Probing the Active Mechanics of Hair Cells - Faster than the Speed of Hearing
    BETH PRUITT (Mechanical Engineering)
    Tony Ricci (Otolaryngology)

    3:50pm
    Closing comments

    4:00pm
    Reception and poster session

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    July 23, 2014
  • Bio-X Corporate Forum Newsletter - August 7, 2014

    Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    HIGHLIGHTS

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".


    Q&A: Stanford's Carla Shatz on fostering successful interdisciplinary collaboration

    A national report on the value of interdisciplinary approaches in the sciences highlighted Stanford Bio-X as a model for success. Carla Shatz, the director of Stanford Bio-X, talks about the report's recommendations and the factors that have helped Bio-X shine. Click here for the article!


    Seed Grants

    **SAVE THE DATE: The next Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Seed Grants Program Symposium is taking place on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 in the Clark Center Auditorium from 1-4 pm, followed by a poster session of various research within the Bio-X community during the reception in the Courtyard. Go below to EVENTS or click here to view the entire agenda with 8 oral presentations on awarded Bio-X Seed Grant projects.

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has closed the 7th RFP for its IIP Seed Grants, and review of the 141 Letters of Intent is underway!

     

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    In 2012, Stanford Bio-X selected 23 new seed grant projects as the winners of the 6th round. Please go here to view the list of awardees, along with the titles of their projects and the abstracts of the research. Competition was intense as the awardees were chosen from 118 Letters of Intent (LOIs). Selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and interdisciplinary collaboration. (To view the 114 other IIP projects that have been funded from the first 5 rounds, please click here.) In addition, SANOFI has also funded 4 new Bio-X IIP Seed Grant projects from round 6!

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    IIP Seed Grants-Related Events

    ** On Monday, March 3, 2014, Bio-X had a Poster Session, featuring 105 different posters from research by all scientists within the Stanford Bio-X community. Over 250 people attended the session, which allowed for an excellent venue to discuss science and research with colleagues from both academia and industry.

    ** On Monday, August 26, 2013, Bio-X had its second annual IIP Symposium of the year at the Clark Center, which highlights projects that exemplify the Stanford Bio-X mission of crossing boundaries to bring about interdisciplinary research and solutions in the field of life bioscience. The symposium was a huge success with over 300 people attending this event, which included 8 oral presentations and 136 poster presentations. Recorded talks from the symposium will be uploaded soon. If you'd like to view the talks for previous symposia through the years, please click here.


    Fellowships

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has recently announced its 19 new fellows for the 10th year of the Bio-X Fellowships!!

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia.

    To date, with the 19 new awardees, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 173 Fellows.

    You can view the numerous Fellowship projects that have been awarded over the years as well as oral presentations from previous symposiums here.

     

    **UPDATE: The 9th annual Bio-X USRP is currently underway with this year's 65 new awardees!!

    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature. This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty.

    To date, with 65 new awardees from 154 applications this year, 306 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.


    News

    Stanford team achieves "Holy Grail" of battery design: a stable lithium anode
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Yi Cui and Steven Chu

    Engineers across the globe have been racing to design smaller, cheaper and more efficient rechargeable batteries to meet the power storage needs of everything from handheld gadgets to electric cars. In a paper published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, researchers at Stanford University report that they have taken a big step toward accomplishing what battery designers have been trying to do for decades – design a pure lithium anode. All batteries have three basic components: an electrolyte to provide electrons, an anode to discharge those electrons and a cathode to receive them. Today, we say we have lithium batteries, but that is only partly true. What we have are lithium ion batteries. The lithium is in the electrolyte but not in the anode. An anode of pure lithium would be a huge boost to battery efficiency. “Of all the materials that one might use in an anode, lithium has the greatest potential. Some call it the Holy Grail,” said Yi Cui, a professor of Materials Science and Engineering and leader of the research team. “It is very lightweight, and it has the highest energy density. You get more power per volume and weight, leading to lighter, smaller batteries with more power.” But engineers have long tried and failed to reach this Holy Grail. “Lithium has major challenges that have made its use in anodes difficult. Many engineers had given up the search, but we found a way to protect the lithium from the problems that have plagued it for so long,” said Guangyuan Zheng, a doctoral candidate in Cui’s lab and first author of the paper. In addition to Cui and Zheng, the research team includes Steven Chu, the former U.S. Secretary of Energy and Nobel Laureate who recently resumed his professorship at Stanford. “In practical terms, if we can triple the energy density and simultaneously decrease the cost four-fold, that would be very exciting. We would have a cell phone with triple the battery life and an electric vehicle with a 300 mile range that cost $25,000 – and with better performance than an internal combustion engine car getting 40 mpg,” Chu said.



    Blood-oxytocin levels in normal range in children with autism, study finds
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Karen Parker and Antonio Hardan

    Autism does not appear to be solely caused by a deficiency of oxytocin, but the hormone’s universal ability to boost social function may prove useful in treating a subset of children with the developmental disorder, according to new findings from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Low levels of oxytocin, a hormone involved in social functioning, have for years been suspected of causing autism. Prior research seeking a link has produced mixed results. Now, in the largest-ever study to test the purported connection, the range of blood oxytocin levels has been shown to be the same in children with autism as that observed in two comparison groups: children with autistic siblings and children without autistic siblings. In other words, similar numbers of children with low, medium and high oxytocin levels were found in all three groups. A paper describing the new findings was published online Aug. 4 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Although autism was not directly linked to oxytocin deficiency, the Stanford team found that higher oxytocin levels were linked to better social functioning in all groups. All children with autism have social deficits, but in the study these deficits were worst in those with the lowest blood oxytocin and mildest in those with the highest oxytocin. In the comparison groups, children’s social skills also fell across a range that correlated to their oxytocin levels.



    Stanford scientists use lasers and carbon nanotubes to look inside living brains
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Hongjie Dai

    Some of the most damaging brain diseases can be traced to irregular blood delivery in the brain. Now, Stanford chemists have employed lasers and carbon nanotubes to capture an unprecedented look at blood flowing through a living brain. The technique was developed for mice but could one day be applied to humans, potentially providing vital information in the study of stroke and migraines, and perhaps even Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The work is described in the journal Nature Photonics. Current procedures for exploring the brain in living animals face significant tradeoffs. Surgically removing part of the skull offers a clear view of activity at the cellular level. But the trauma can alter the function or activity of the brain or even stimulate an immune response. Meanwhile, non-invasive techniques such as CT scans or MRI visualize function best at the whole-organ level; they cannot visualize individual vessels or groups of neurons.



    Autistic brain less flexible at taking on tasks, study shows
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Vinod Menon

    The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. Instead of changing to accommodate a job, connectivity in key brain networks of autistic children looks similar to connectivity in the resting brain. And the greater this inflexibility, the more severe the child’s manifestations of repetitive and restrictive behaviors that characterize autism, the study found. The study, published online July 29 in Cerebral Cortex, used functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, to examine children’s brain activity at rest and during two tasks: solving simple math problems and looking at pictures of different faces. The study included an equal number of children with and without autism. The developmental disorder, which now affects one of every 68 children in the United States, is characterized by social and communication deficits, repetitive behaviors and sensory problems.



    Researchers discover universal molecular ‘flag’ that highlights critical genes
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Anne Brunet

    After probing more than 200 genetic data sets, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a molecular flag that labels genes critical to a cell’s function. The flag appears to exist universally — in cells ranging from worms to humans — and can be used to help decipher the function of unfamiliar cells, said Anne Brunet, PhD, associate professor of genetics and senior author of the study. For example, by examining a cell’s collection of flagged genes, researchers can classify a cell as a muscle, skin or other type of cell. “This is the new era of using available data to make really new hypotheses and new discoveries,” Brunet said. “This paper exemplifies why it’s nice to be at Stanford where we’re embracing big data.” The study was published in the July 31 issue of Cell. This identifying flag is a long molecule, abbreviated as H3K4me3, that attaches to the proteins associated with DNA called histones. Other researchers had spotted this flag, but no one had probed its prevalence or significance. It generally marks about 1,000 genes in each cell, but the genes flagged vary among types of cells, Brunet said. The molecule does not cue the cells to make more of the proteins encoded by the genes it marks. Instead, Brunet said, she believes it regulates how frequently the DNA is transcribed, ensuring that the critical proteins are produced methodically, like clockwork, rather than in spurts of rapid transcription followed by transcription-free gaps.



    Study reveals brain mechanism behind chronic pain’s sapping of motivation
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Rob Malenka

    Chronic pain is among the most abundant of all medical afflictions in the developed world. It differs from a short-term episode of pain not only in its duration, but also in triggering in its sufferers a psychic exhaustion best described by the question, “Why bother?” A new study in mice, conducted by investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has identified a set of changes in key parts of the brain that may explain chronic pain’s capacity to stifle motivation. The discovery could lead to entirely new classes of treatment for this damaging psychological consequence of chronic pain. Many tens of millions of people in the United States suffer persistent pain due to diverse problems including migraines, arthritis, lower back pain, sports injuries, irritable bowel syndrome and shingles. For many of these conditions, there are no good treatments, and a crippling loss of mojo can result. “With chronic pain, your whole life changes in a way that doesn’t happen with acute pain,” said Robert Malenka, MD, PhD, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the study’s senior author. “Yet this absence of motivation caused by chronic pain, which can continue even when the pain is transiently relieved, has been largely ignored by medical science.” A series of experiments in mice by Malenka and his colleagues, described in a study published Aug. 1 in Science, showed that persistent pain causes changes in a set of nerve cells in a deep-brain structure known to be important in reward-seeking behavior: the pursuit of goals likely to yield pleasurable results. Malenka’s lab has been studying this brain structure, the nucleus accumbens, for two decades. “We showed that those brain changes don’t go away when you transiently relieve the mice’s pain,” Malenka said. The experiments also indicated that the mice’s diminished motivation to perform reward-generating tasks didn’t stem from their pain’s rendering them incapable of experiencing pleasure or from any accompanying physical impairment, he said.



    Rare developmental disorder linked to tumor-suppressing protein, researchers find
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Laura Attardi

    A protein known for its tumor-suppressing properties can also trigger developmental disorders, including CHARGE syndrome, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. CHARGE, which affects 1 in 10,000 babies, is an acronym whose letters stand for some of the more common symptoms of the condition: coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital and/or urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness. Originally, the researchers were examining the tumor-suppressive properties of the protein, called p53, not investigating developmental disorders. But when a mouse model developed a strange set of deficiencies, the researchers followed a trail of clues that led them to link p53 with CHARGE syndrome. “It was a very big surprise and very intriguing,” said Jeanine Van Nostrand, PhD, lead author of a paper describing the research and a former Stanford graduate student, now at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies. “P53 had never before been shown to have a role in CHARGE.” The paper was published online Aug. 3 in Nature. The senior author is Laura Attardi, PhD, professor of radiation oncology and of genetics.



    Stanford bioengineers create remote-controlled nanoscale protein motors
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Zev Bryant

    In every cell in your body, tiny protein motors are toiling away to keep you going. Moving muscles, dividing cells, twisting DNA – they are the workhorses of biology. But there is still uncertainty about how they function. To help biologists in the quest to know more, a team of Stanford bioengineers has designed a suite of protein motors that can be controlled remotely by light. "Biology is full of these nanoscale machines that can perform complex tasks," said Zev Bryant, an assistant professor of bioengineering and leader of the team. "We want to understand how they can convert chemical energy into mechanical work and perform their specific tasks in cells." Bryant's team, including doctoral student Muneaki Nakamura, designed blueprints for protein motors that would respond to light. Splicing together DNA from different organisms such as pig, slime mold and oat – the oat had the light-detecting module – the bioengineers created DNA codes for each of their protein motors. The remote-controlled nanomotors are described by Nakamura, Bryant and their colleagues in a paper that appeared online Aug. 3 in Nature Nanotechnology.


    Events

    Anesthesia
    August 11, 2014, 6:45 am - 8 am
    LKSC Lecture Hall 130, Stanford, CA
    "Issues in Anesthesia Related Health Policy Research: Evidence of Value & Value of Evidence"
    Speaker: Thomas Miller, PhD, MBA Director of Health Policy Research, ASA
    Neurology & Neurosciences
    August 22, 2014, 8 am - 9 am
    300 Pasteur Drive/LKSC-130, Stanford, CA
    "Rapidly Progressive Dementia"
    Speaker: Michael Geschwind, MD, UCSF
    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium

    Wednesday, August 27, 2014
    Clark Center Auditorium
    Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program grant awardees will give fifteen-minute presentations at the symposium. A poster session will be held during a post symposium reception, where students involved in interdisciplinary research will present their work.

    1:00pm
    Introduction

    1:10pm
    Biomarkers of the Social Deficits of Children with Autism
    KAREN PARKER (Psychiatry)
    Antonio Hardan (Psychiatry)
    Joshua Elias (Chemical & System Biology)
    Sonia Partap(Neurology)

    1:30pm
    Pluridirectional High-energy Agile Scanning Electron Radiotherapy (PHASER): A Novel Design for Radiation Treatment of Cancer
    PETER MAXIM (Radiation Oncology)
    Billy Loo (Radiation Oncology)
    Sami Tantawi (SLAC)

    1:50pm
    Visualizing the Molecular Processes of the Retina in Living Subjects
    ADAM DE LA ZERDA (Structural Biology)
    Mark Blumenkranz (Ophthalmology)

    2:10pm
    Single Molecule and High-Resolution Imaging of Developmental Signal Transducers
    W.E. MOERNER (Chemistry)
    Matthew Scott (Developmental Biology)

    2:30pm
    Developing Biomimetic Hydrogels to Enhance Pluripotent Stem Cell-based Therapy for Smooth Muscle Tissue Repair
    FAN YANG (Orthopaedic Surgery)
    Renee Reijo Pera (Obstetrics and Gynecology)
    Bertha Chen (Obstetrics and Gynecology)

    2:50pm
    Real-time Measurements of Biological Interactions using Multiplexed Peptide Arrays on Silicon Wafer
    PJ UTZ (Medicine)
    Shan Xiang Wang (Electrical Engineering)

    3:10pm
    Engineering the Outside of the Cell from Within: Cytoskeletal Control of Cell Wall Structure and Mechanics
    KC HUANG (Bioengineering)
    Wolf Frommer (Biology)
    David Ehrhardt (Plant Biology)

    3:30pm
    Probing the Active Mechanics of Hair Cells - Faster than the Speed of Hearing
    BETH PRUITT (Mechanical Engineering)
    Tony Ricci (Otolaryngology)

    3:50pm
    Closing comments

    4:00pm
    Reception and poster session

    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    August 07, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact us if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.


    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X on the SPLASH PAGE as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".

     


    Seed Grants

    ** UPDATE: Bio-X has just recently closed its 7th RFP for the IIP Seed Grants, and has received 141 Letters of Intent!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    In 2012, Stanford Bio-X selected 23 new seed grant projects as the winners of the 6th round. Please go here to view the list of awardees, along with the titles of their projects and the abstracts of the research. Competition was intense as the awardees were chosen from 118 Letters of Intent (LOIs). Selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and interdisciplinary collaboration. (To view the 114 other IIP projects that have been funded from the first 5 rounds, please click here.) In addition, SANOFI has also funded 4 new Bio-X IIP Seed Grant projects from round 6!

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    IIP Seed Grants-Related Events

    ** On Monday, March 3, 2014, Bio-X had a Poster Session, featuring 105 different posters from research by all scientists within the Stanford Bio-X community. Over 250 people attended the session, which allowed for an excellent venue to discuss science and research with colleagues from both academia and industry.

    ** On Monday, August 26, 2013, Bio-X had its second annual IIP Symposium of the year at the Clark Center, which highlights projects that exemplify the Stanford Bio-X mission of crossing boundaries to bring about interdisciplinary research and solutions in the field of life bioscience. The symposium was a huge success with over 300 people attending this event, which included 8 oral presentations and 136 poster presentations. Recorded talks from the symposium will be uploaded soon. If you'd like to view the talks for previous symposia through the years, please click here.

     


    Fellowships

    ** UPDATE: Bio-X has just closed its RFP for the 11th annual competition for the Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowships with 100+ submissions.

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia. To date, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 152 Fellows.

    On June 26, 2013, Bio-X held its annual Bio-X Fellows Symposium, where there were four 15-minute oral presentations followed by one-minute spiels from current fellows. The 25 newest fellows selected this year were also announced, and about 100 attendees came to the symposium. Please click on the "Bio-X Fellows Symposium" link above for the agenda and titles of the talks, and on the icon of the brochure above for the updated and latest Bio-X Fellowships brochure.

    To view the numerous projects that have been awarded over the years, please click here.



    ** UPDATE: Bio-X has just closed its RFP for the 9th annual Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program for the summer of 2014, with 154 applications.

    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature.

    This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty. To date, 241 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program. This summer is Stanford Bio-X's 8th round of USRP.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.

     


    News

    Neural activity promotes brain plasticity through myelin growth, researchers find
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Michelle Monje

    The brain is a wonderfully flexible and adaptive learning tool. For decades, researchers have known that this flexibility, called plasticity, comes from selective strengthening of well-used synapses — the connections between nerve cells. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have demonstrated that brain plasticity also comes from another mechanism: activity-dependent changes in the cells that insulate neural fibers and make them more efficient. These cells form a specialized type of insulation called myelin. “Myelin plasticity is a fascinating concept that may help to explain how the brain adapts in response to experience or training,” said Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences. The researchers’ findings are described in a paper published online April 10 in Science Express. “The findings illustrate a form of neural plasticity based in myelin, and future work on the molecular mechanisms responsible may ultimately shed light on a broad range of neurological and psychiatric diseases,” said Monje, senior author of the paper. The lead authors of the study are Stanford postdoctoral scholar Erin Gibson, PhD, and graduate student David Purger.


    Blood test could provide rapid, accurate method of detecting solid cancers, study finds
    Radiation Oncology Faculty Maximilian Diehn and Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ash Alizadeh

    A blood sample could one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient’s body and responses to treatment. Previous versions of the approach, which relies on monitoring levels of tumor DNA circulating in the blood, have required cumbersome and time-consuming steps to customize it to each patient or have not been sufficiently sensitive. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a way to quickly bring the technique to the clinic. Their approach, which should be broadly applicable to many types of cancers, is highly sensitive and specific. With it they were able to accurately identify about 50 percent of people in the study with stage-1 lung cancer and all patients whose cancers were more advanced. “We set out to develop a method that overcomes two major hurdles in the circulating tumor DNA field,” said Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, the CRK Faculty Scholar and assistant professor of radiation oncology. “First, the technique needs to be very sensitive to detect the very small amounts of tumor DNA present in the blood. Second, to be clinically useful it’s necessary to have a test that works off the shelf for the majority of patients with a given cancer.” The researchers describe their findings in a paper published online April 6 in Nature Medicine. Diehn shares senior authorship with Ash Alizadeh, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine. Postdoctoral scholars Aaron Newman, PhD, and Scott Bratman, MD, PhD share lead authorship.


    Inspired by a music box, Stanford bioengineer creates $5 chemistry set
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Manu Prakash

    When Manu Prakash was young he had a thing about flames. He's not encouraging all kids to follow his fiery lead – he did burn one hand pretty badly – but he thinks kids should explore more when it comes to learning about science. That's the idea behind his programmable, toy-like device that won a competition to "reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century." The Science Play and Research Kit Competition (SPARK) was jointly sponsored by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Society for Science & the Public. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, will receive a $50,000 award toward further developing his prototype into a low-cost product, which he thinks can have widespread use both in the developing world and as a creative toy for kids. "In one part of our lab we've been focusing on frugal science and democratizing scientific tools to get them out to people around the world who will use them," Prakash said. "I'd started thinking about this connection between science education and global health. The things that you make for kids to explore science are also exactly the kind of things that you need in the field because they need to be robust and they need to be highly versatile."


    Stanford scientists discover a novel way to make ethanol without corn or other plants
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Matthew Kanan

    Stanford University scientists have found a new, highly efficient way to produce liquid ethanol from carbon monoxide gas. This promising discovery could provide an eco-friendly alternative to conventional ethanol production from corn and other crops, say the scientists. Their results are published in the April 9 advanced online edition of the journal Nature. "We have discovered the first metal catalyst that can produce appreciable amounts of ethanol from carbon monoxide at room temperature and pressure – a notoriously difficult electrochemical reaction," said Matthew Kanan, an assistant professor of chemistry at Stanford and coauthor of the Nature study.

     


    Events

    Pathology
    April 15, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Munzer Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Tumor Biology Seminars- "Tuesday Cancer Talks" - New roles for sirtuins in tumor Metabolism
    Speaker: Marcia Haigis, PhD, Harvard Medical School
    Developmental Biology
    April 16, 2014, 4 pm - 5 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Biology: "Wiring and unwiring the brain: role of microglia and the complement cascade"
    Speaker: Beth Stevens, Harvard
    Biology
    April 21, 2014, 4 pm - 6 pm
    393 Serra Mall, Herrin T-175, Stanford, CA
    "Damage Control - How the Pink1/Parkin pathway can regulate removal of impaired mitochondria by autophagy"
    Speaker: Richard Youle, National Institutes of Health
    Genetics
    April 23, 2014, 4 pm - 5 pm
    Clark Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    Frontiers in Biology Seminar: "Imaging RNA and RNA biology using RNA mimics of green fluorescent protein"
    Speaker: Samie R. Jaffrey MD, PhD

     


    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    April 14, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from Stanford Bio-X for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University.

    Highlights

    ** On October 9, 2013, Bio-X celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the James H. Clark Center, the hub of Bio-X. Check out CLARK CENTER @ 10X on the SPLASH PAGE as well as the Bio-X Timeline over the last 15 years!!

    ** Check out the article by Stanford President John Hennessy in the Nov/Dec 2013 issue of the Stanford Magazine on Bio-X and the Clark Center, "A Cauldron of Innovation".

     


    Seed Grants

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has closed the 7th RFP for its IIP Seed Grants, and review of the 141 Letters of Intent is underway!

    SEED GRANTS FOR SUCCESS - Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford Initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From its inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 114 different interdisciplinary projects, involving collaborations from over 300 faculty members, and creating over 450 teams from five different Stanford schools. From just the first 5 rounds, the IIP awards have resulted in a 10-fold-plus return on investment, as well as hundreds of publications, dozens of patents filed, and most importantly, the acceleration of scientific discovery and innovation.

    In 2012, Stanford Bio-X selected 23 new seed grant projects as the winners of the 6th round. Please go here to view the list of awardees, along with the titles of their projects and the abstracts of the research. Competition was intense as the awardees were chosen from 118 Letters of Intent (LOIs). Selection criteria included innovation, high-reward, and interdisciplinary collaboration. (To view the 114 other IIP projects that have been funded from the first 5 rounds, please click here.) In addition, SANOFI has also funded 4 new Bio-X IIP Seed Grant projects from round 6!

    We are cultivating and are highly successful in building meaningful collaborations with numerous corporate colleagues. New collaborations through our seed grant projects are highly encouraged. To learn about how to get involved, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey.

    IIP Seed Grants-Related Events

    ** On Monday, March 3, 2014, Bio-X had a Poster Session, featuring 105 different posters from research by all scientists within the Stanford Bio-X community. Over 250 people attended the session, which allowed for an excellent venue to discuss science and research with colleagues from both academia and industry.

    ** On Monday, August 26, 2013, Bio-X had its second annual IIP Symposium of the year at the Clark Center, which highlights projects that exemplify the Stanford Bio-X mission of crossing boundaries to bring about interdisciplinary research and solutions in the field of life bioscience. The symposium was a huge success with over 300 people attending this event, which included 8 oral presentations and 136 poster presentations. Recorded talks from the symposium will be uploaded soon. If you'd like to view the talks for previous symposia through the years, please click here.

     


    Fellowships

    **UPDATE: Bio-X has closed the RFP for its 11th annual Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowships, and received 100+ submissions. We will be announcing the new awardees this June 26th at the annual Fellows' Symposium.

    BIO-X FELLOWSHIPS

    Every year, graduate students and postdoctoral scholars of Bio-X affiliated faculty are highly encouraged to apply for the Bio-X Fellowships, which are awarded to research projects that are interdisciplinary and utilize the technologies of different fields to solve different biological questions. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with professors of different departments, thus creating cross-disciplinary relationships among the different Stanford schools. Our fellows have conducted exciting research, resulting in publications in high-impact journals and have been offered excellent positions in industry and academia. To date, Stanford Bio-X has a total of 152 Fellows.

    On June 26, 2013, Bio-X held its annual Bio-X Fellows Symposium, where there were four 15-minute oral presentations followed by one-minute spiels from current fellows. The 25 newest fellows selected this year were also announced, and about 100 attendees came to the symposium. Please click on the "Bio-X Fellows Symposium" link above for the agenda and titles of the talks, and on the icon of the brochure above for the updated and latest Bio-X Fellowships brochure.

    To view the numerous projects that have been awarded over the years, please click here.



    **UPDATE: Bio-X has closed the RFP for its 9th annual Bio-X USRP, and received 154 applications. The program will be starting end of this month with our new awardees.

    BIO-X UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program supports undergraduate research training through an award designed to support interdisciplinary undergraduate summer research projects. The program is an invaluable opportunity for students to conduct hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature.

    This program is eligible to Stanford students who want to work in the labs of Bio-X affiliated faculty. To date, 241 students have been awarded the opportunity to participate in the Bio-X Undergraduate Summer Research Program. This summer is Stanford Bio-X's 8th round of USRP.

    Participating undergraduates are also required to present poster presentations on the research that they've conducted during the program. Please click here for title lists of past posters that our undergraduates have presented.

    Many fruitful collaborations and relationships have been established with industry through fellowships. Please contact Dr. Hanwei Li or Dr. Heideh Fattaey if you'd like to learn more about how to get involved with these fellowship programs.

     


    News

    Solving big questions requires big computation

    A common thread among research efforts across Stanford’s many disciplines is the growing use of sophisticated algorithms, run by brute computing power, to solve big questions. In Earth sciences, computer models of climate change or carbon sequestration help drive policy decisions, and in medicine computation is helping unravel the complex relationship between our DNA and disease risk. Even in the social sciences, computation is being used to identify relationships between social networks and behaviors, work that could influence educational programs. “There’s really very little research that isn’t dependent on computing,” says Ann Arvin, vice provost and dean of research. Arvin helped support the recently opened Stanford Research Computing Center (SRCC) located at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which expands the available research computing space at Stanford. The building’s green technology also reduces the energy used to cool the servers, lowering the environmental costs of carrying out research. “Everyone we’re hiring is computational, and not at a trivial level,” says Stanford Provost John Etchemendy, who provided an initial set of servers at the facility. “It is time that we have this facility to support those faculty.” Here are just a few examples of how Stanford faculty are putting computers to work to crack the mysteries of our origins, our planet and ourselves.


    Stanford engineer invents safe way to transfer energy to medical chips in the body
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Ada Poon

    A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed. The discoveries reported May 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences culminate years of efforts by Ada Poon, assistant professor of electrical engineering, to eliminate the bulky batteries and clumsy recharging systems that prevent medical devices from being more widely used. The technology could provide a path toward a new type of medicine that allows physicians to treat diseases with electronics rather than drugs. "We need to make these devices as small as possible to more easily implant them deep in the body and create new ways to treat illness and alleviate pain," said Poon. Poon's team built an electronic device smaller than a grain of rice that acts as a pacemaker. It can be powered or recharged wirelessly by holding a power source about the size of a credit card above the device, outside the body.


    Stanford, MIT scientists find new way to harness waste heat
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Yi Cui

    Vast amounts of excess heat are generated by industrial processes and by electric power plants. Researchers around the world have spent decades seeking ways to harness some of this wasted energy. Most such efforts have focused on thermoelectric devices – solid-state materials that can produce electricity from a temperature gradient – but the efficiency of such devices is limited by the availability of materials. Now researchers at Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a new alternative for low-temperature waste-heat conversion into electricity – that is, in cases where temperature differences are less than 100 degrees Celsius. The new approach is described in a study, published in the May 21 issue of the journal Nature Communications, by Seok Woo Lee and Yi Cui at Stanford and Yuan Yang and Gang Chen at MIT. "Virtually all power plants and manufacturing processes, like steelmaking and refining, release tremendous amounts of low-grade heat to ambient temperatures," said Cui, an associate professor of materials science and engineering. "Our new battery technology is designed to take advantage of this temperature gradient at the industrial scale."


    Stanford researchers discover immune system's rules of engagement
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty K. Chris Garcia

    A study led by researchers at Stanford's School of Medicine reveals how T cells, the immune system's foot soldiers, respond to an enormous number of potential health threats. X-ray studies at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, combined with Stanford biological studies and computational analysis, revealed remarkable similarities in the structure of binding sites, which allow a given T cell to recognize many different invaders that provoke an immune response. The research demonstrates a faster, more reliable way to identify large numbers of antigens, the targets of the immune response, which could speed the discovery of disease treatments. It also may lead to a better understanding of what T cells recognize when fighting cancers and why they are triggered to attack healthy cells in autoimmune diseases such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. "Until now, it often has been a real mystery which antigens T cells are recognizing; there are whole classes of disease where we don't have this information," said Michael Birnbaum, a graduate student who led the research at the School of Medicine in the laboratory of K. Christopher Garcia, the study's senior author and a professor of molecular and cellular physiology and of structural biology. "Now it's far more feasible to take a T cell that is important in a disease or autoimmune disorder and figure out what antigens it will respond to," Birnbaum said.


    On alert: Study identifies cell-cycle phase that primes stem cells for action
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Tom Rando

    Resting, adult stem cells of many types of tissues enter a reversible “alert” phase in response to a distant injury, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The study describes for the first time a new phase in the resting portion of the cell cycle. It also explains how stem cells prime themselves to rapidly respond to tissue damage without prematurely committing to energetically expensive (and possibly unnecessary) cell division. These alert cells are distinct from fully resting or fully activated stem cells, and they divide and repair subsequent tissue damage much more quickly than do fully resting stem cells. The findings imply that nearly any type of injury may put stem cells throughout the body on notice for possible future regenerative needs. “These alert stem cells changed markedly in response to a distant muscle injury,” said Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, professor of neurobiology and neurological sciences. “They are partially awake and are poised to respond to additional challenges and make new tissue as needed. This is a systemic, or whole-body, response to injury that has never been seen before.” The researchers suggest the alert phase represents a novel form of cellular memory similar to that displayed by the immune system, which relies upon prior experiences to drive future responses.Rando, who also directs Stanford’s Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging, is the senior author of the study, published online May 25 in Nature. Postdoctoral scholar Joseph Rodgers, PhD, is the lead author.


    Coaxing iPS cells to become more specialized prior to transplantation cuts rejection risk, study shows
    Bio-X Affiliated Faculty Joseph Wu

    For many scientists, the clinical promise of stem cells has been dampened by very real concerns that the immune system will reject the transplanted cells before they could render any long-term benefit. Previous research in mice has suggested that even stem cells produced from the subject’s own tissue, called iPS cells, can trigger an immune attack. Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that coaxing iPS cells in the laboratory to become more-specialized progeny cells (a cellular process called differentiation) before transplantation into mice allows them to be tolerated by the body’s immune system. “Induced pluripotent stem cells have tremendous potential as a source for personalized cellular therapeutics for organ repair,” said Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. “This study shows that undifferentiated iPS cells are rejected by the immune system upon transplantation in the same recipient, but that fully differentiating these cells allows for acceptance and tolerance by the immune system without the need for immunosuppression.” The findings are described in a paper published online May 30 in Nature Communications. Wu is senior author of the paper. Postdoctoral scholars Patricia Almeida, PhD, and Nigel Kooreman, MD, and assistant professor of medicine Everett Meyer, MD, PhD, share lead authorship.

     


    Events

    Neurosciences Institute
    June 5, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Clark Auditorium, Stanford, CA
    "Glia in development and maintenance of synaptic positions: lessons from C. elegans"
    Speaker: Daniel Colon-Ramos, PhD, Yale
    Genetics
    June 9, 2014, 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
    LKSC Rm LK 130, Stanford, CA
    "Pathogenomics: Solving old (idiopathic) problems with new (metagenomic) tools"
    Speaker: Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Center
    Pathology
    June 12, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Edwards Building Rm 358, Stanford, CA
    "Epithelial cells as barrier and immune regulators: Therapeutic target for allergic airway disease "
    Speaker: Ruby Pawankar, MD, PhD, Nippon Medical School
    Cardiovascular Institute
    June 17, 2014, 12 pm - 1 pm
    Alway M106, Stanford, CA
    "Inflammation, immunity and hypertension. You’ve got to be kidding?"
    Speaker: David Harrison, MD, Betty and Jack Bailey Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology

     


    Resources

    Stanford University
    Stanford Bio-X
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Stanford Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Bio-X Corporate Forum Liaison, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    June 04, 2014
  • Welcome to the biweekly electronic newsletter from the Bio-X Program at Stanford University for members of the Bio-X Corporate Forum. Please contact us if you would like to be added or removed from this distribution list, or if you have any questions about Bio-X or Stanford.


    New Corporate Forum Liaison

    Hanwei Li, Ph.D., is the newest member of Bio-X, and she is joining the team as the Corporate Forum Liaison. Her background includes professional experience in biotechnology, specifically in the field of antibodies and immunology, and research experience in tissue engineering and matrix remodeling for musculoskeletal diseases. She holds a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    As the Corporate Forum Liaison, she will develop and manage corporate affiliate relations to Bio-X through collaborations with world-class Stanford researchers, and facilitate meetings with the Stanford Office of Technology Licensing. Through technical summits, seminars, and other events, these collaborations will foster essential foundations to support leading-edge discoveries.

     


    Seed Grant Program

    Seed Grants for Success, Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP)

    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program represents a key Stanford initiative to address challenges in human health. The IIP awards approximately $3 million every other year in the form of two-year grants averaging about $150,000 each. From inception in 2000 through the fifth round in 2010, the program has provided critical early-stage funding to 113 interdisciplinary projects involving more than 293 faculty representing five Stanford schools and dozens of departments. Please save the date for our next Symposium on September 26, 2011 in the James H. Clark Center Auditorium at Stanford. Bio-X IIP grant awardees will give fifteen-minute presentations at the symposium. A poster session will be held during a post-symposium reception, where students involved in interdisciplinary research will present their work. Please see the list of speakers below under "Events".

    To view the talks given at the Bio-X March 11, 2011 IIP Symposium please go to: http://bioxchannel.stanford.edu/groups/biox/wiki/1a9ac/IIP_Symposium__March_2011.html. The videos will work on both Windows and Mac operating systems with "typical" browsers (IE, Firefox, Safari). The Quicktime Player Plugin is required to view the video content. It can be downloaded at http://www.apple.com/quicktime/. The videos are delivered in a streaming format; therefore, playback quality may be affected by the internet speed of the user.

     


    News

    Stanford researchers show that there's more than one way to read - with implications for reading disorders - Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship Funded Research
    In a research paper appearing in last week's Neuron, neuroscientists from the Stanford Vision Imaging Science and Technology Lab demonstrate that one key to VWFA (Visual Word Form Area) function is its ability to recognize words through more than one visual pathway. The finding not only demonstrates the flexibility of the human visual system, but may also have implications for our understanding of dyslexia and other reading disorders.


    Fingertip-size microscope has huge potential for studying the brain and its diseases, say Stanford researchers - Bio-X NeuroVentures CNC Program Funded Research
    A readily portable miniature microscope weighing less than 2 grams and tiny enough to balance on your fingertip has been developed by Stanford University researchers. The scope is designed to see fluorescent markers, such as dyes, commonly used by medical and biological researchers studying the brains of mice. The new device has no moving parts that would require realignment if the scope gets jostled and, aside from the outer lens, it is sealed against dust, making it well suited for use outside the lab.


    Does that hurt? Objective way to measure pain being developed at Stanford
    Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine have taken a first step toward developing a diagnostic tool that could eliminate a major hurdle in pain medicine — the dependency on self-reporting to measure the presence or absence of pain. The new tool would use patterns of brain activity to give an objective physiologic assessment of whether someone is in pain.


    Beachy to receive Keio science prize
    The Keio Medical Science Prize from Keio University in Tokyo has been awarded to Philip Beachy, PhD, professor of biochemistry and of developmental biology. ... Beachy, who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, is receiving the prize in recognition of his identification of “hedgehog,” a key molecule in development, and its medical applications.


    "Raman's 'Effect' on Molecular Imaging" - publication in Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol 52
    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that offers unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities to the field of molecular imaging. In the past, Raman spectroscopy had predominantly been used as an analytic tool for routine chemical analysis, but more recently, researchers have been able to harness its unique properties for imaging and spectral analysis of molecular interactions in cell populations and preclinical animal models. Additionally, researchers have already begun to translate this optical technique into a novel clinical diagnostic tool using various endoscopic strategies.


    "Endothelial Cells Derived From Human iPSCS Increase Capillary Density and Improve Perfusion in A Mouse Model of Peripheral Arterial Disease" - publication in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Vol 31
    Stem cell therapy for angiogenesis and vascular regeneration has been investigated using adult or embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the potential of endothelial cells (ECs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to promote the perfusion of ischemic tissue in a murine model of peripheral arterial disease.


    "Antagonistic VEGF variants engineered to simultaneously bind to and inhibit VEGFR2 and {alpha}v{beta}3 integrin" - publication in PNAS, Vol 108 Iss 34
    Significant cross-talk exists between receptors that mediate angiogenesis, such as VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. Thus, agents that inhibit both receptors would have important therapeutic potential. Here, we used an antagonistic VEGF ligand as a molecular scaffold to engineer dual-specific proteins that bound to VEGFR2 and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin with antibody-like affinities and inhibited angiogenic processes in vitro and in vivo.

     


    Events

    Cancer Biology
    September 20, 12:30-1:30 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium: Stanford, CA
    "To the Telomeres and Beyond: Chromatin Regulation by the Mammalian Sirtuin SIRT6"
    Speaker: Ruth Tennen, Thesis Defense
    Neurology and Neurological Sciences
    September 21, 7:30 pm
    Room M-114, Stanford University School of Medicine
    "Deep brain modulation of hypersynchrony and movement in Parkinson's disease"
    Speaker: Helen Bronte-Stewart, M.D., MSE, Professor of Stanford University School of Medicine
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    September 23, 12-1 pm
    Li Ka Shing Rm 120: Stanford, CA
    "Genetic approaches to study the circadian and homeostatic control of sleep"
    Speaker: Amita Sehgal, Ph.D., Professor of University of Pennsylvania
    Nanobiotechnology Seminar Series
    September 27, 2011, 4:30 - 5:30 pm
    Paul G. Allen Auditorium: Stanford, CA
    "Engineering of Polymeric Nanoparticles from Medical Applications"
    Speaker: Omid Farokhzad, M.D., Professor of Harvard University
    MIPS/Philips Molecular Imaging Seminar Series
    September 26, 4:30 - 5:30 pm
    Clark S360: Stanford, CA
    "Ultra-pH Sensitive (UPS) Nanomedicine: Amplifying Tumor Microenvironment Signals for Cancer-Specific Imaging"
    Speaker: Jinming Gao, Ph.D., Professor of UT Southwestern Medical Center
    Bioengineering
    October 13, 11 am
    Clark S360: Stanford, CA
    "Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminars"
    Speaker: Ido Golding, Ph.D., Professor of Baylor College of Medicine
    Bio-X IIP Symposium
    September 26, 1:20-5:30 pm
    Clark Center Auditorium: Stanford, CA

    Symposium Talk Titles and Speakers:
    1:20 pm - Introduction

    1:30 pm - Multicolor Optical Control of Skeletal Muscle - Scott Delp, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

    1:50 pm - Investigating the Impact of Audiovisual Biofeedback in Anatomic and Functional Imaging - Bill Loo, M.D., Ph.D. (Radiation Oncology)

    2:10 pm - Integrative Proteo-Genomics to Develop Common Non-Invasive Diagnostic Assays for Graft Injury - Atul Butte, M.D., Ph.D. (Pediatrics) and Minnie Sarwal, M.D., Ph.D. (Pediatrics)

    2:30 pm - Structure-Inspired Design of Biostable Inhibitors of hRSV Entry: Designing Peptoid-Based Viral Inhibitors Based on Minimal Peptides that Block hRSV Fusion - Annelise Barron, Ph.D. (Bioengineering)

    2:50 pm - Carbon Nanotube-Mediated Systemic siRNA Delivery for Cancer Therapy - Calvin Kuo, M.D., Ph.D. (Hematology)

    3:10 pm - Development and Applications of Real-Time fMRI Technology - Gary Glover, Ph.D. (Radiology)

    3:50 pm - Closing comments

    4:00 pm - Reception and poster session

     


    Resources

    Stanford University
    Bio-X at Stanford University
    Bio-X Seed Grants
    The Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Program (IIP) provides seed funding for high-risk, high-reward, collaborative projects across the university, and have been highly successful in fostering transformative research.
    Office of Technology and Licensing "Techfinder"
    Search the OTL Technology Portal to find technologies available for licensing from Stanford.
    Stanford Center for Professional Development
    - Take advantage of your FREE membership!
    - Take online graduate courses in engineering, leadership and management, bioscience, and more.
    - Register for free webinars and seminars, and gets discounts on courses.
    Stanford Biodesign Video Tutorials on how FDA approves medical devices
    A series of video briefs recently produced by the Stanford Biodesign Program teaches innovators how to get a medical device approved for use in the United States. This free, online library of 60 videos provides detailed information on the Food and Drug Administration regulatory process, short case studies and advice on interacting with the FDA.

    To learn more about Bio-X or Stanford University, please contact Dr. Hanwei Li, the Corporate Forum Liaison of Bio-X, at 650-725-1523 or lhanwei1@stanford.edu, or Dr. Heideh Fattaey, the Executive Director of Bio-X Operations and Programs, at 650-799-1608 or hfattaey@stanford.edu.

    Release Date: 
    September 16, 2011

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