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Seminar

  • March 22, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    “Monitoring protein synthesis in time and space with ribosome profiling”

    JONATHAN WEISSMAN, UCSF

    The Weissman laboratory is looking at how cells ensure that proteins fold into their correct shape, as well as the role of protein misfolding in disease and normal physiology. They are also developing experimental and analytical approaches for exploring the organizational principles of biological systems and globally monitoring protein translation through ribosome profiling.

    Abstract:

    I will talk about recent applications of ribosome profiling including: the identification of novel protein coding regions, demonstration of the principle of proportional synthesis of subunits in multiprotein complexes and monitoring localized protein translation using proximity-specific ribosome profiling.

    I will also present our work on the identification and characterization of the ER membrane complex (EMC) and our functional studies establishing that the EMC is a general chaperone for the biogenesis of multipass membrane proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) supports biosynthesis of proteins with diverse transmembrane domain lengths and hydrophobicity. Imperfections in transmembrane domains such as charged residues in ion channels are often functionally important, but make co-translational membrane insertion and folding challenging. Our systematic proteomic approaches in both yeast and human cells revealed that the EMC binds to and promotes the biogenesis of a broad range of multipass transmembrane proteins. Proximity-specific ribosome profiling demonstrates that the EMC engages clients cotranslationally preferentially at imperfect transmembrane domains. The EMC can remain associated after completion of translation which both protects clients from premature proteasomal degradation and allows recruitment of substrate-specific and general chaperones. Thus the EMC broadly enables the biogenesis of multipass transmembrane proteins containing destabilizing features, thereby mitigating the trade off between function and stability.

    March 22nd, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • March 08, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Molecular, Genetic and Neural Mechanisms of Moods and Emotions

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar
    HUDA AKIL, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    Understanding the biological causes of Major Depression continues to present a major challenge to clinicians, geneticists and neurobiologists. It has become evident that we cannot rely on a single approach or model system to make headway in uncovering the causes or devising treatments for this highly prevalent, often devastating disorder. This talk is an overview of a multidisciplinary and collaborative team effort, which includes colleagues at Stanford University, whereby we tackle this challenge by integrating genomic and neurobiological approaches in the context of both human and animal studies. Our research program is uncovering some molecular players that are not “the usual suspects”, thereby providing possibilities for new biomarkers and novel drug targets in the treatment of Major Depression.

    March 8th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar March 6th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • February 08, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Social, Behavioral, and Biological Linkages in Young Adult Health

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar
    KATHIE HARRIS, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) integrated social and biological sciences in its 1995 design to survey and measure the health of over 20,000 U.S. adolescents and follow them into adulthood. Add Health has interdisciplinary, multilevel, longitudinal social, behavioral, psychological, environmental, biological, and genetic data on a nationally-representative young adult cohort now in their early 30s. With these data, Add Health is mapping the social, behavioral, and biological precursors of health risk in young adulthood, well before disease symptoms and consequences are evident. I will describe the interdisciplinary design of Add Health and what we have learned by merging social and biological data on the health of young adults in America.

    February 8th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Ben Domingue, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar February 6th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • January 18, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Autophagy dynamics in neuronal homeostasis and neurodegeneration

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar
    ERIKA HOLZBAUR, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

    Dr. Holzbaur's lab is interested in exploring the dynamics of autophagy and mitophagy in neurons, including compartment biogenesis, cargo recognition and capture, and active transport coupled to cargo degradation. Approaches in the lab include live cell imaging in cell lines and primary neurons, in vitro reconstitution assays with single molecule resolution to analyze dynamics of motors and the cytoskeleton, and the development and analysis of animal models for neurodegenerative disease.

    Neurons are highly polarized cells that are post-mitotic and must survive for decades in humans.  These cells rely on homeostatic mechanisms to maintain cellular health, including autophagy and mitophagy.  Deficits in autophagic flux lead to the accumulation of protein aggregates and dysfunctional mitochondria, and are characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and ALS.  Live cell imaging of autophagy in neurons has revealed a dynamic pathway that is altered in both aging and disease.

    January 18th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Xinnan Wang, Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar January 16th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • May 17, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    JENNIFER ZALLEN, MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER

    The Zallen lab is using molecular, genetic, and cell biological approaches to understand the machinery that directs morphogenetic events. Their analysis is motivated by three central questions: How do cells establish asymmetry? How does this asymmetry mobilize the cytoskeleton to promote cell movement? And what is the spatial information that coordinates these movements across a multicellular population? An understanding of the cell rearrangements that occur during normal embryonic development will uncover general principles that build tissues and organs and can provide insight into how deranged versions of these processes contribute to human disease.

    May 17th, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • May 04, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    PAUL NURSE, THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE

    The goals of Dr. Nurse's laboratory are to better understand the global cellular networks which regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle, cell form and cell growth. These cellular controls are fundamental to the growth, development and reproduction of all living organisms. They are also relevant to understanding disease particularly cancer. Unrestricted cell proliferation during cancer is often associated with altered cell cycle and cell growth controls, and shape changes are associated with metastatic cells when they are escaping their tissue of origin and migrating elsewhere in the body.

    May 4th, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • April 12, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    ZEV GARTNER, UCSF

    The Gartner lab seeks to answer questions about how tissue structure forms and functions. They take a synthetic approach, building human tissues from the bottom-up, which allows them to measure and perturb the molecular and physical properties of individual cells, reconstitute them into living tissue, then observe their interactions to reveal the underlying "rules" guiding their collective behaviors. The lab focuses primarily on the cells and tissues of the human breast, and their work incorporates experimental principles from the chemical, biological, and engineering sciences.

    April 12th, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • March 08, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    BRUCE EDGAR, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

    The Edgar lab's research focuses on the mechanisms that control cell growth and proliferation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. The superlative genetic tools and fast life cycle of this tiny model organism make it a powerful system for discovery-based research, and its genetic similarity to humans makes much of what is discovered relevant to human biology and health.

    The Edgar lab uses genetics to characterize the programs of cell growth and proliferation that occur during development, regeneration and tumorigenesis, with the goal of finding the genes that act as limiting regulators in each context. They furthermore seek to understand how networks of genes and communities of cells in a tissue function as integrated systems.

    March 8th, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • February 22, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    BIL CLEMONS, CALTECH

    The Clemons lab is primarily interested in understanding the molecular details of life and as a tool we focus on “structural biology”. They currently work on problems related to protein transport across membranes and post-translational modification of proteins. The lab primarily uses X-ray crystallography but also works with biochemistry, microbiology, mass spectrometry and electron microscopy.

    February 22nd, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • February 01, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    MATTHIEU PIEL, INSTITUT CURIE

    Dr. Piel's team studies cell polarization, a process which involves a reorganization of the cell cytoskeleton and movement of cellular organelles, usually triggered by external cues. They are particularly interested in cell polarity in the context of cell migration and cell division. They develop and use innovative tools based on nano and micro-fabrication techniques, to control and modulate the main physical and chemical parameters of the cell micro-environment. These tools are coupled with high quality quantitative microscopy, and used alongside molecular and cell biology techniques, to obtain a quantitative description of the cell behavior. As well as highlighting new basic concepts about cell polarity, the Piel team's multidisciplinary approach leads to the development of novel tools with potential applications in biomedical research.

    February 1st, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • January 18, 2018 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    AMY GLADFELTER, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILL

    The Gladfelter lab is interested in how cells are organized in time and space.  They study how cytoplasm is spatially patterned and how cells sense their own shape.  They also investigate how timing in the cell division cycle can be highly variable yet still accurate. For their work, they combine quantitative live cell microscopy and computational, genetic and biochemical approaches in fungal and mammalian cells.

    January 18th, 2018 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2017/2018 Seminar Series

    To sign up for the mailing list, please send a blank message to frontiers-qbio-join@lists.stanford.edu.

  • May 22, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Reinterpreting the Genetic Code - Engineering and Probing Protein Behavior with Non-Canonical Amino Acids"

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    H. TOM SOH, DEPARTMENTS OF RADIOLOGY AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

    Attend Dr. Soh's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. David Tirrell's seminar, "Reinterpreting the Genetic Code - Engineering and Probing Protein Behavior with Non-Canonical Amino Acids", to be held Thursday, May 24th.

  • May 01, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "The Importance of Cell Type: Molecular Mechanisms of Circuit Modulation in the Mammalian Brain"

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    XIAOKE CHEN, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

    Attend Dr. Chen's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Nathaniel Heintz's seminar, "The Importance of Cell Type: Molecular Mechanisms of Circuit Modulation in the Mammalian Brain", to be held Thursday, May 3rd.

  • April 10, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Computational Model-Driven Design of Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts"

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    ALISON MARSDEN, DEPARTMENTS OF PEDIATRICS AND BIOENGINEERING

    Attend Dr. Marsden's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Jay Humphrey's seminar, "Computational Model-Driven Design of Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts", to be held Thursday, April 12th.

  • March 06, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Molecular, Genetic and Neural Mechanisms of Moods and Emotions"

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    ALAN SCHATZBERG, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

    Attend Dr. Schatzberg's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Huda Akil's seminar, "Molecular, Genetic and Neural Mechanisms of Moods and Emotions", to be held Thursday, March 8th.

  • February 06, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Social, Behavioral, and Biological Linkages in Young Adult Health"

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    BEN DOMINGUE, GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

    Attend Dr. Domingue's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Kathie Harris's seminar, "Social, Behavioral, and Biological Linkages in Young Adult Health", to be held Thursday, February 8th.

  • January 16, 2018 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Autophagy dynamics in neuronal homeostasis and neurodegeneration"

    Stanford bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar
    XINNAN WANG, DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY

    January 16th, 2018 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S361

    Attend Dr. Wang's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Erika Holzbaur's seminar, "Autophagy dynamics in neuronal homeostasis and neurodegeneration", to be held Thursday, January 18th.

  • November 30, 2017 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Modeling human brain development and disorders using hiPSCs

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar
    GUO-LI MING, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    Three dimensional (3D) cerebral organoid cultures from human iPSCs have been recently developed to recapitulate the cytoarchitecture of the developing brain. This system offers unique advantages in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms governing embryonic neural development and in modeling congenital neurodevelopmental disorders, such as microcephaly. We have improved the organoid technology and developed a protocol to produce forebrain-specific organoids derived from human iPSCs using a novel miniaturized spinning bioreactor that recapitulate the human embryonic cortical development. I will discuss our recent work in using the brain organoids to model and dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the ZIKV pathogenesis and microcephaly.

    November 30th, 2017 at 12:00 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Sergiu Pasca, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar November 28th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • August 04, 2010 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 
    Research Area: 
    Undergraduate Research

    As part of the Undergraduate Summer Research Program, four Stanford faculty per week who are mentoring program students give talks to expose stuents to a variety of scientific fields and enrich their summer research experience.

  • August 30, 2017 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 
    Research Area: 
    Undergraduate Research

    As part of the Undergraduate Summer Research Program, three Stanford faculty per week who are mentoring program students give talks to expose stuents to a variety of scientific fields and enrich their summer research experience.

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