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Seminar

  • April 11, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Empathy by Neuroimaging: Making Humanized Brain Maps to Support Scientific Discovery, Education and Improved Health Care"

    JENNIFER MCNAB, DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY

    April 11th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S361

    Attend Dr. McNab's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Jacopo Annese's seminar, "Empathy by Neuroimaging: Making Humanized Brain Maps to Support Scientific Discovery, Education and Improved Health Care", to be held Thursday, April 13th.

  • February 23, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    LAURA JOHNSTON, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Dr. Johnston's laboratory investigates the mechanisms used by growing tissues to gauge and regulate the collective and individual fitness of cells, thereby optimizing tissue and animal fitness. They are interested in the basic biological mechanisms that regulate these processes, how they contribute to development of healthy tissues and in understanding their relevance to developmental and tumorigenic pathologies. They use the simple genetic model organism Drosophila and utilize strategies that allow manipulation of growth and cell fitness in living, growing animals. Their projects include: how the growth regulator Myc mediates competitive interactions during tissue and organ growth; investigation of homeostatic processes, including metabolism, that allow cells to sense and respond to growth changes in their local environment; identification of factors that act as sensors and mediators of cellular fitness; and genetic and molecular dissection of tissue regeneration. These processes provide plasticity to growing organs and give cells control over their local environment.

    February 23rd, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • March 07, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Physical chemistry and machine learning meet innate immunity"

    BO WANG, DEPARTMENT OF BIOENGINEERING and JIAN QIN, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

    Attend Dr. Wang's and Dr. Qin's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Gerard Wong's seminar, "Physical chemistry and machine learning meet innate immunity", to be held Thursday, March 9th.

  • March 09, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Physical chemistry and machine learning meet innate immunity

    GERARD WONG, UCLA

    Biomolecular self-assembly can play unexpected roles in infectious diseases and immunity. It is a commonplace notion that specific binding plays critical roles in the immune system. Here, we explore how one can construct exquisitely specific interactions using non-specific interactions. Specifically, we will discuss how organization of immune ligands impacts immune activation via Toll-Like Receptors, the surprising role played by innate immunity peptides in this organization, and how these effects are at play in inflammation induced by heart disease, necrotic cell death, neutrophil extracellular traps, and autoimmune diseases. We will also discuss how machine learning can be used to map out the undiscovered sequence space of antimicrobial peptides, and how this knowledge may be used to create new molecules against multi-drug resistant pathogens by renovating existing obsolete antibiotics.

    Gerard C. L. Wong is a Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry, and the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA. Wong received his BS and PhD at Caltech physics and Berkeley physics respectively. He joined the Materials Science & Engineering Dept and Physics Dept at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2000 and moved to UCLA in 2009. His research recognition includes: the Beckman Young Investigator Award, Alfred P Sloan Fellowship, and Sackler Distinguished Speaker. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (2011), and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology (2016). His current research interests include bacterial biofilms, innate immunity, and antibiotic design.

    March 9th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Bo Wang, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar March 7th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • February 14, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Pre-Seminar for "Lymphatic vessels in inflammation and cancer: Linking mechanobiology with immune regulation"

    ANNELISE BARRON, DEPARTMENT OF BIOENGINEERING

    February 14th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S361

    Attend Dr. Barron's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Melody Swartz's seminar, "Lymphatic vessels in inflammation and cancer: Linking mechanobiology with immune regulation", to be held Thursday, February 16th.

  • February 16, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Lymphatic vessels in inflammation and cancer: Linking mechanobiology with immune regulation

    MELODY SWARTZ, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

    In tissues, interstitial fluid flow is mechanically coupled to lymphatic drainage, and both are often increased in acute inflammation as well as in the tumor microenvironment where steeper-than-normal pressure gradients exist at the tumor margin due to higher fluid pressure in tumors. It has long been assumed that local lymph formation is driven primarily by pressure gradients generated by interstitial fluid stress and downstream lymphatic pump function, but we have found that vesicular transendothelial transport also contributes significantly to lymph formation and is actively regulated by the lymphatic endothelium according to inflammatory stimuli, allowing fine control of the delivery of antigens, cells, and chemokines to the local lymph node. While exploring why such delivery would need active control by lymphatic endothelial cells, we also discovered some fundamental roles that the lymphatic endothelium plays in the regulating immunity, including direct antigen presentation to T cells. In some types of inflammation, local lymphatic expansion and activation occurs, in turn changing the biomechanical and cytokine environments that alter the immune microenvironment. For example, in some cancers, we found that tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis leads to the activation of TGF-and increased interstitial flow, both of which promote fibroblast differentiation and matrix remodeling. Lymphatic activation also triggers the release of cytokines that attract immune cells that, together with TGF-can promote an immune suppressive microenvironment and help the tumor escape from host immunity. Finally, our lab is exploring ways to translate this new knowledge towards strategies for immunotherapy.

    February 16th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Annelise Barron, Associate Professor of Bioengineering, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar February 14th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • January 19, 2017 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Guiding BioRegeneration with Supramolecular Materials

    SAMUEL STUPP, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    Supramolecular materials have emerged over the past decade as chemical systems in which non-covalent polymerization of hundreds to millions of molecules generates soft matter with extremely valuable functions. Their interactions with cells have been particularly interesting given their ability to, mimic the architecture of extracellular matrices, signal receptors, and also bind or protect therapeutic proteins. A particularly remarkable opportunity is the use of these materials to regenerate tissues and organs, using the necessary chemistry to mediate signaling pathways and other processes such as biological adhesion. This lecture will demonstrate the use of these supramolecular biomaterials in regeneration of the spinal cord, cartilage, bone, muscle, and blood vessels, among others. The lecture will also describe the possibility of using these systems dynamically to turn signals to cells “on and off” reversibly, a direction which may prove useful in the management of stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    January 19th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Helen Blau, Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar January 17th, 2017 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • December 09, 2016 12:00 PM to 1:15 PM
    Hartley Conference Room
    Mitchell Earth Sciences, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford CA, 94305
    Event Type: 

    Opportunities and tension points associated with integrating teaching and research

    VPTL Talk co-sponsored by WISE Ventures and the Department of Biology

    SARA BROWNELL, ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Sara Brownell is a neuroscientist turned full-time education researcher, who teaches undergraduate biology while researching ways to improve biology education. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Biology at Stanford and worked in Dr. Larry Steinman's neuroimmunology lab. Concurrently with her Ph.D. in Biology, she earned a M.A. in Education from the Stanford School of Education, working with Dr. Rich Shavelson. She initially started working on education research projects as part of a redesign of introductory lab courses in the Department of Biology at Stanford. She completed postdoctoral training in biology education research with Dr. Kimberly Tanner at San Francisco State University and Dr. Scott Freeman and Dr. Alison Crowe at the University of Washington. Now as an Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University, she uses both qualitative and quantitative data to better understand how undergraduate biology students learn and how instructors can develop more effective ways to teach.

    Brownell's interests in undergraduate biology education are broad, but her current work focuses on three main avenues. She is investigating the impact of undergraduate research experiences on students, specifically students enrolled in course-based research experiences. She is developing a programmatic assessment for biology majors that focuses on the core concepts of biology. She is also exploring issues related to access and equity in undergraduate biology, specifically the experiences of women, religious students, and LGBTQIA students.

    December 9th, 2016 at 12:00 PM, Hartley Conference Room, Mitchell Earth Sciences Building. Lunch to be provided.

    Join us for a reception from 1:30 - 2:00, followed by a second talk at 2:00 PM:
    Hidden inequities in active learning classrooms: How groups of students are differentially impacted by active learning

  • December 09, 2016 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
    Hartley Conference Room
    Mitchell Earth Sciences, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford CA, 94305
    Event Type: 

    Hidden inequities in active learning classrooms: How groups of students are differentially impacted by active learning

    VPTL Talk co-sponsored by WISE Ventures and the Department of Biology

    SARA BROWNELL, ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

    Abstract:

    In response to calls for implementing active learning in college-level STEM courses, classrooms across the country are being transformed from instructor centered to student centered. In these active-learning classrooms, the dynamics among students become increasingly important for understanding student experiences. We have explored the experiences of students in active learning classrooms and have found differences in their experiences based on their social identities. In this talk, I will discuss recent work examining the experiences of women and LGBTQIA students in active learning classrooms, including small group discussions. This work will hopefully help instructors to consider structuring their in-class activities in ways that promote equity, which may require more purposeful attention to alleviating the current differential student experiences with peer discussions.

    Speaker Bio:

    Sara Brownell is a neuroscientist turned full-time education researcher, who teaches undergraduate biology while researching ways to improve biology education. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Biology at Stanford and worked in Dr. Larry Steinman's neuroimmunology lab. Concurrently with her Ph.D. in Biology, she earned a M.A. in Education from the Stanford School of Education, working with Dr. Rich Shavelson. She initially started working on education research projects as part of a redesign of introductory lab courses in the Department of Biology at Stanford. She completed postdoctoral training in biology education research with Dr. Kimberly Tanner at San Francisco State University and Dr. Scott Freeman and Dr. Alison Crowe at the University of Washington. Now as an Assistant Professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University, she uses both qualitative and quantitative data to better understand how undergraduate biology students learn and how instructors can develop more effective ways to teach.

    Brownell's interests in undergraduate biology education are broad, but her current work focuses on three main avenues. She is investigating the impact of undergraduate research experiences on students, specifically students enrolled in course-based research experiences. She is developing a programmatic assessment for biology majors that focuses on the core concepts of biology. She is also exploring issues related to access and equity in undergraduate biology, specifically the experiences of women, religious students, and LGBTQIA students.

    December 9th, 2016 at 2:00 PM, Hartley Conference Room, Mitchell Earth Sciences Building.

    Don't miss Dr. Brownell's first talk at 12:00 PM, to be followed by a reception from 1:30 - 2:00:
    Opportunities and tension points associated with integrating teaching and research

  • December 08, 2016 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    The development of optical coherence tomography as a medical device

    BRETT BOUMA, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL AND MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Optical coherence tomography, an imaging modality based on interferometric detection of backscattered infrared light, was initially demonstrated in 1991. Twenty five years later, it is the established gold-standard for retinal disease diagnosis and ophthalmic intervention guidance. Endoscopic and catheter-based OCT instruments have also been commercialized and disseminated, enabling the clinical investigation of their use to improve diagnostic screening or surveillance. The technical advances as well as the hurdles that underpin the long development timeline of OCT will be discussed and the current clinical status will be reviewed.

    December 8th, 2016 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Audrey Bowden, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar December 6th, 2016 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

  • November 16, 2016 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    "Do Facts Matter? How to exist in a world where lies are treated as if they are true"

    Michael Specter, Staff Writer for The New Yorker

    November 16th, 2016 at 4:00 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Michael Specter has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, and has written frequently about AIDS, T.B., and malaria in the developing world, as well as about agricultural biotechnology, avian influenza, the world’s diminishing freshwater resources, synthetic biology and editing DNA with CRISPR technology. His Profile subjects have included Dr. Oz, Peter Singer, Larry Kramer, and Richard Branson, the anti-GMO activist Vandana Shiva, along with Sean (P. Diddy) Combs, Manolo Blahnik, Ingrid Newkirk, the controversial leader of PETA, and Miuccia Prada. Previously, he worked at the New York Times as its senior foreign correspondent, based in Rome; from 1995 to 1998, he served as the paper’s Moscow bureau chief.

    Before joining the Times, he served as the Washington Post’s national science reporter and, later, as its New York bureau chief. In 1996, he received an Overseas Press Club citation for his reporting on the war in Chechnya. He has twice received the Global Health Council’s annual Excellence in Media Award: in 2002, for “India’s Plague,” and in 2005, for “The Devastation,” about the ethics of testing H.I.V. vaccines in Africa. His article “Rethinking the Brain” received the 2002 AAAS Science Journalism Award.

    He is the author of “Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives,” which, in 2010, received the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry’s Robert P. Balles Annual Prize in Critical Thinking. He received the 2011 WHO reporting award for his article about TB in India, A Deadly Misdiagnosis. His piece “Against the Grain” won a 2015 James Beard Award in the Food and Health category. He is currently on leave from The New Yorker to write a book about the future of editing DNA.

  • November 17, 2016 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
    Clark Center Auditorium
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    "Engineering the improved reach of vaccines: from needles to rockets to Nanopatches"

    Mark A. F. Kendall, Delivery of Drugs and Genes Group, D2G2, The Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia

    November 17th, 2016 at 4:00 PM in the Clark Center Auditorium

    Abstract:

    Vaccines have produced one of the largest increases in the age of life expectancy in human history. However massive challenges remain, with 17 million deaths per year due to infectious disease – mostly in the developing-world.

    I will discuss the particular challenges holding back vaccines within the developing world; together with potential solutions under development.

    My particular focus will move to the needle and syringe: currently the main vaccination method, which was first invented in 1853. The needle is holding back the rollout of vaccines by (1) placing vaccine into muscle, arguably missing our immune “sweet spot”); (2) the need for maintaining the refrigeration “cold chain” of the vaccine in liquid form; and (3) cross-contamination through needle-stick injuries.

    I will then discuss the idea of hand-held rockets to fire micro-particulate vaccines into the skin – otherwise called the “gene gun” which took me from the field of hypervelocity aerodynamics to drug and vaccine delivery to Oxford. The concept, science, technology attributes will be discussed.

    I will then introduce the Nanopatch – conceived to tackle all three of the needle-based problems (and fresh challenges of the “gene gun”) – a patch bearing an ultra-high density array of projections that delivers dry-coated vaccine into the skin's outer layers; abundant with immune cells. In addition, I will outline the Nanopatch journey from idea towards clinical utility as a medical device product.


    Bio:

    Professor Mark Kendall has more than 18 years of experience researching the field of needle-free gene and drug delivery to skin – and diagnostics devices – with micro-nanostructures. Mark has published more than 200 papers and is an inventor on more than 130 patents. He has worked closely with Industrial partners in the technology transfer from concept to commercialisation. He has delivered more than 100 invited, keynote or plenary lectures in seventeen countries. Since year 2000, he has attracted more than $60 million in research funding, with ~$30 million of this as the Leading Investigator. Mark founded Vaxxas Pty Ltd in 2011, the commercialisation arm of the Nanopatch (in which he has played a pivotal role; securing $40 million in funding and partnering with Merck and the WHO). His Biolistics technology has been successfully commercialised with PowderMed (the technology transfer company) purchased by Pfizer for $400 million in 2006. Mark joined the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) after 8 years at the University of Oxford, where he was Associate Director of the PowderJect Centre for Gene and Drug Delivery Research, a University Research Lecturer and College Lecturer.

    Mark has won many awards for his contributions to the field. Examples include being awarded a prestigious 2012 Rolex Laureate award. In 2011, he won the Australian Innovation Challenge prize, and the Australia Museum Eureka Prize winner for “2011 Research by an Interdisciplinary Team” in Research and Innovation. One of his technologies won the “Best Medical Innovation 2005” of “Popular Science” Magazine. Recipient of the “Younger Engineer of Britain” Prize awarded at the House of Parliament in London in 2004.

    Mark has communicated his ideas in many forums, including a TEDGlobal talk, and the World Economic Forum Davos.

  • May 18, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    CHRISTINE JACOBS-WAGNER, YALE UNIVERSITY

    The Jacobs-Wagner group studies the temporal and spatial mechanisms involved in bacterial physiology, with emphasis on chromosome dynamics, cell division, cell cycle regulation, cell morphogenesis and RNA biology. Their primary model organisms are Caulobacter crescentus, Escherichia coli and the Lyme disease pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi.

    May 18th, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • February 09, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    JODI NUNNARI, UC DAVIS

    The research in the Nunnari laboratory is devoted to understanding how the behavior of mitochondria is controlled in cells. Specifically, they are focused on two fundamental problems. The first is how the structure of mitochondria is established and maintained within cells. They are currently elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie mitochondrial division and fusion. The lab's second area of interest is on understanding how the mitochondrial genome is organized and faithfully segregated within the organelle. The inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is influenced by the morphology of the organelle and by specific mtDNA-associated structures: proper inheritance is essential for cell survival and for respiratory competence. In addition, the regulation of mitochondrial copy number, morphology and distribution is critical for normal cellular differentiation and function. Not surprisingly, defects in mitochondrial structure and mtDNA maintenance are associated with an increasing number of human diseases.

    February 9th, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • June 01, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    MIKE LEVINE, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

    The Levine lab has studied mechanisms responsible for switching genes on and off in the early Drosophila embryo for over 30 years. These studies led to the characterization of the eve stripe 2 enhancer, short-range repression, and the regulation of long-range enhancer-promoter interactions. For nearly 20 years they have also studied the gene networks underlying the development of a simple protovertebrate, the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. These studies led to the identification of rudimentary tissues for key innovations of the vertebrate “new head”, including cranial neural crest, neurogenic placodes, and the second heart field.

    June 1st, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • April 06, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    JOHAN ELF, UPPSALA UNIVERSITY

    The Elf lab has developed new methods for probing transcription factor dynamics at the level of single molecule in living cells. These methods make it possible to study gene regulation directly and at a higher time resolution than methods based on expression of reporter genes. The lab is also developing new methods for tracking individual proteins molecules in living cells at ms time resolution.

    April 6th, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • March 09, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    LUCAS PELKMANS, UNIVERSITY OF ZURICH

    The Pelkmans lab operates at the forefront of research in quantitative cell biology, in the study of cell-to-cell variability, as well as in systems approaches based on large- scale genetic perturbations and network biology. Over the years, they have made groundbreaking discoveries in virus entry, endocytosis, and the assembly of caveolae. They pioneered multi-parametric image-based RNAi screens in mammalian cells, they were the first to reveal that cell-to-cell variability in human cells is largely predictable, they have defined a novel type of regulatory genetic interaction and mapped these in the endocytic membrane system, and they invented image-based transcriptomics. They have also uncovered a novel principle by which a kinase couples liquid phase transitions in the cytoplasm to signal transduction, and identified a cell-intrinsic molecular mechanism by which cells adapt their lipid composition to local crowding, driving variability in single- cell behavior and pattern formation in cell populations. The lab is highly motivated to stay at the forefront of these fields by developing new computational and single- cell methods and by combining unbiased data-driven research with reductionist approaches in innovative ways.

    March 9th, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • January 19, 2017 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    ERIC SIGGIA, THE ROCKEFELLER UNIVERSITY

    Developmental genetics has furnished the parts list for vertebrate development, but it is not remotely possible to reassemble those parts and predict the outcome. Embryonic stem cells can recapitulate slices of development and thus provide a rich readout of the signaling pathways that pattern the embryo. Dr. Siggia wishes to quantify the genetic signals that define morphogenesis.

    January 19th, 2017 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • November 10, 2016 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    TERENCE HWA, UC SAN DIEGO

    Current activities in the Hwa lab are in the area of quantitative and systemic biology. This is an emerging area of research at the interface of biology, biochemistry, engineering, and physics. In this post-genome era, it is clear that the complexity of a biological organism resides not merely in the intricacies of its components (e.g., proteins), but more importantly in the array of interactions these components can have with each other. This shift of paradigm is initiating a revolution in biology: Instead of focusing on genes, proteins, and pathways, bioloigsts are beginning to think in terms of modules and networks. However, a significant challenge lies in the fact that much of the interactions of the subsystems are yet unknown.

    November 10th, 2016 at 2:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology 2016/2017 Seminar Series

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  • November 03, 2016 12:15 PM to 1:00 PM
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305
    Event Type: 

    3 cancer stories – from colloidal drug aggregates to 3D cell culture to targeted delivery

    MOLLY SHOICHET, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

    We have become very interested in drug discovery, drug screening and drug delivery in cancer. (1) In collaboration with Brian Shoichet’s lab at UCSF, we found that drug molecules that form stable colloidal aggregates in solution lead to both false positives and false negatives in conventional drug screening applications. This has led to a better understanding of the formation and stability of colloidal drug aggregates. (2) In collaboration with Bill Stanford’s lab at uOttawa, we have been interested in drug screening and the role of the extracellular microenvironment on cell fate. We synthesized a biomimetic 3-dimensional hydrogel in which to grow cancer cells. We are now investigating the different elements of the extracellular matrix on cell fate and how to screen drugs in this perhaps more relevant (and predictive) microenvironment. (3) In collaboration with Masad Damha’s lab at McGill and Dev Sidhu’s lab at UofT, we have been interested in drug delivery and have designed biodegradable, amphiphilic polymeric nanomicelles that enable co-delivery of chemotherapeutics with targeting antibodies and siRNA. We have synthesized polymers that enable high drug loading in thermodynamically stable nanomicelles and selective cellular uptake of chemotherapeutics and siRNA for gene knockdown.

    November 3rd, 2016 at 12:15 PM in Clark Center Seminar Room S360


    Hosted by:

    Fan Yang, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering, Stanford University

    Pre-Seminar November 1st, 2016 at 12:15 PM in Clark S361

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