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Seminar

  • October 02, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S361
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Pre-Seminar

    BIANXIAO CUI, DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

    Attend Dr. Cui's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Bozhi Tian's seminar, "Physical biology at the semiconductor-enabled biointerfaces", to be held Thursday, October 4th.

  • August 27, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Seminar

    Lucien Weiss, Stanford Bio-X Bowes Fellow and Zuckerman Postdoctoral Fellow, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology

    Imaging fluorescently-labeled DNA in live cells with nanoscale precision shows significant promise as a diagnostic tool; however, the intrinsically stochastic nature of biological systems limits our ability to interpret meaningful signals from the noise. Here we discuss the implementation of advanced, 3D microscopy into an imaging flow cytometer and the unique calibration protocol we developed, in which we rely on statistical distributions rather than the unattainable static ground-truth. We demonstrate our system on live yeast cells, attaining 3D spatial information with orders of magnitude higher throughput than previous methods.

  • August 01, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Featuring talks from Stanford Faculty:

     Jonathan Pollack
     Carolyn Bertozzi
     Shirit Einav

  • August 16, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Seminar
     

    Rasmus Fonseca, PhD
    "An integrative study of the activation mechanism of heterotrimeric protein Gs complexes"

    Ninna Struck Rossen, PhD
    "Engineering a tissue-mimicking platform to assess cancer metastasis therapy in vivo"

    Tue Herlau, PhD
    "Reliable inference of dynamical brain networks from multi-subject fMRI data"

  • July 18, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Featuring talks from Stanford Faculty:

     Tony Wyss-Coray
     Jamshid Ghajar
     Thomas Südhof

  • June 27, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Featuring talks from Stanford Faculty:

     Rajat Rohatgi
     Seung Kim
     Scott Dixon

  • May 24, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    DAVID TIRRELL, CALTECH

    Through the efforts of Dr. Tirrell's laboratory and others, the code has been "reinterpreted" in various ways to enable the participation of an expanded set of amino acids in cellular protein synthesis.  These developments have provided a basis for powerful new approaches to protein design and to spatially and temporally resolved analysis of cellular processes.

  • May 03, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    NATHANIEL HEINTZ, THE ROCKEFELLER UNIVERSITY

    Dr. Heintz will discuss recent studies of molecular mechanisms that regulate specific cell types and circuits in the mammalian brain, and illustrate their role in modulation of complex social and emotional behaviors.

  • April 12, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    JAY HUMPHREY, YALE UNIVERSITY

    The Fontan surgical procedure is used to treat children born with particular congenital heart defects, namely to provide a direct connection between the inferior vena cava and the right pulmonary artery. This procedure has proven successful in better oxygenating and delivering blood despite the absence of one ventricle. Tissue engineering promises to enable an improved vascular conduit and is in clinical trials in the USA. There is a need, however, to find an optimal scaffold design that can minimize possible post-operative complications.

  • March 22, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    JONATHAN WEISSMAN, UCSF

    The Weissman laboratory is looking at how cells ensure that proteins fold into their correct shape, as well as the role of protein misfolding in disease and normal physiology. They are also developing experimental and analytical approaches for exploring the organizational principles of biological systems and globally monitoring protein translation through ribosome profiling.

  • March 08, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    HUDA AKIL, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    Dr. Akil's research program is uncovering some molecular players that are not “the usual suspects”, thereby providing possibilities for new biomarkers and novel drug targets in the treatment of Major Depression.

  • February 08, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    KATHIE HARRIS, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

    Dr. Harris will describe the interdisciplinary design of The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health and what has been learned by merging social and biological data on the health of young adults in America.

  • January 18, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Stanford Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences Seminar

    ERIKA HOLZBAUR, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

    Dr. Holzbaur's lab is interested in exploring the dynamics of autophagy and mitophagy in neurons, including compartment biogenesis, cargo recognition and capture, and active transport coupled to cargo degradation. Approaches in the lab include live cell imaging in cell lines and primary neurons, in vitro reconstitution assays with single molecule resolution to analyze dynamics of motors and the cytoskeleton, and the development and analysis of animal models for neurodegenerative disease.

  • May 17, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    JENNIFER ZALLEN, MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER

    The Zallen lab is using molecular, genetic, and cell biological approaches to understand the machinery that directs morphogenetic events. An understanding of the cell rearrangements that occur during normal embryonic development will uncover general principles that build tissues and organs and can provide insight into how deranged versions of these processes contribute to human disease.

  • May 04, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    PAUL NURSE, THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE

    The goals of Dr. Nurse's laboratory are to better understand the global cellular networks which regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle, cell form and cell growth. These cellular controls are fundamental to the growth, development and reproduction of all living organisms.

  • April 12, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    ZEV GARTNER, UCSF

    The Gartner lab seeks to answer questions about how tissue structure forms and functions. They take a synthetic approach, building human tissues from the bottom-up, which allows them to measure and perturb the molecular and physical properties of individual cells, reconstitute them into living tissue, then observe their interactions to reveal the underlying "rules" guiding their collective behaviors.

  • March 08, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    BRUCE EDGAR, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

    The Edgar lab uses genetics to characterize the programs of cell growth and proliferation that occur during development, regeneration and tumorigenesis, with the goal of finding the genes that act as limiting regulators in each context.

  • February 22, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    BIL CLEMONS, CALTECH

    The Clemons lab is primarily interested in understanding the molecular details of life and as a tool we focus on “structural biology”. They currently work on problems related to protein transport across membranes and post-translational modification of proteins. The lab primarily uses X-ray crystallography but also works with biochemistry, microbiology, mass spectrometry and electron microscopy.

  • February 01, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    MATTHIEU PIEL, INSTITUT CURIE

    Dr. Piel's team studies cell polarization, a process which involves a reorganization of the cell cytoskeleton and movement of cellular organelles, usually triggered by external cues. They are particularly interested in cell polarity in the context of cell migration and cell division.

  • January 18, 2018
    Clark Center Seminar Room S360
    James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305

    Frontiers in Quantitative Biology Seminar

    AMY GLADFELTER, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHAPEL HILL

    The Gladfelter lab is interested in how cells are organized in time and space.  They study how cytoplasm is spatially patterned and how cells sense their own shape.  They also investigate how timing in the cell division cycle can be highly variable yet still accurate. For their work, they combine quantitative live cell microscopy and computational, genetic and biochemical approaches in fungal and mammalian cells.

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